Confederate Wall of Honor

Confederate Soldiers

[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_benjamin-grier-collins.jpg]6040
Benjamin Grier Collins 1845-1929 was a CSA Soldier from Horry County, SC. Photo circa 1920.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-barnard-elliott-bee.jpg]1860
Barnard Elliott Bee Jr. (February 8, 1824 ? July 22, 1861) was a career United States Army officer and a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War. He was mortally wounded at the First Battle of Bull Run, one of the first general officers to be killed in the war. During that battle, he was responsible for inspiring the famous nickname for Brig. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. Upon the start of the Civil War, Bee, like many Army officers from the South, was torn between loyalty to his home state or to the federation of the United States. He struggled with the decision, but opted to stay with the South. On March 3, 1861, Bee resigned from the United States Army and returned to Charleston where he was elected lieutenant colonel of the 1st South Carolina Regulars.
On June 17, 1861, Bee was appointed brigadier general of a brigade mobilized at Manassas Junction. He was given command of the third brigade of the Army of the Shenandoah, under Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. During the subsequent battle, later known as the First Battle of Bull Run, Bee is said to have used the term "stone wall" in reference to Brig. Gen. Thomas J. Jackson and his men, giving rise to the name "Stonewall Jackson" and his Stonewall Brigade. (There has been debate over whether this was meant in admiration or as an insult over Jackson's men not advancing.) Bee was mortally wounded as the Confederates began to gain the upper hand in the battle. He died the following day and is buried in Pendleton, South Carolina. As a result, it could not be determined whether his naming of Stonewall Jackson was intended as praise, a condemnation, or whether it was simply a misattributed quote.[1]
Bee was the younger brother of Hamilton P. Bee, who was also a Confederate Army general.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-james-chesnut-jr.jpg]1600
James Chesnut, Jr. (January 18, 1815 ? February 1, 1885) of Camden, South Carolina, was a planter, lawyer, United States Senator, a signatory of the Constitution of the Confederate States of America, and a Confederate States Army general.Chesnut participated in the South Carolina secession convention in December 1860 and was subsequently elected to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America. He was a member of the committee which drafted the Constitution of the Confederacy.
In the spring of 1861, he served as an aide-de-camp to General P.G.T. Beauregard and was sent by the general to demand the surrender of Fort Sumter in Charleston. After the commander of the fort, Major Robert Anderson of the U.S. Army declined to surrender, Chesnut gave orders to the nearby Fort Johnson to open fire on Fort Sumter. In consequence the first shots of the Civil War were fired, on April 12, 1861.[2] In the summer of 1861 Chesnut also took part in the First Battle of Manassas as an aide-de-camp to Beauregard.
In 1862 Chesnut served as a member of the South Carolina's Executive Council and the Chief of the Department of the Military of South Carolina. Later in the war he served the Confederate Army as a colonel and an aide to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. In 1864 he was promoted to brigadier general and given command of South Carolina reserve forces until the end of the war. After the war, he returned to the practice of law in Camden and formed the Conservative Party of South Carolina.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-james-conner.jpg]1330
Brig Gen James Conner Birth:Sep. 1, 1829
Death:Jun. 26, 1883

Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. Born in Charleston, he was one of the best officers that South Carolina furnished the Confederacy. He was a graduate of South Carolina College, and became a distinguished lawyer and a United States district attorney before the outbreak of the Civil War. Serving as Captain of the Montgomery Guards, a local militia company, he participated in the bombardment of Fort Sumter. He entered Confederate service in May 1861 keeping his captaincy while leading the Hampton Legion, a mixed command of cavalry, infantry, and artillery. At First Bull Run, when Colonel Wade Hampton fell wounded, he led the legion, earning promotion to Major, and fighting with the unit during the Peninsula Campaign through the Battle of Seven Pines. In June 1862 he became Colonel of the 22nd North Carolina, serving as its commander for 2 years. A disciplinarian, he never earned the volunteer soldiers' affection, but his courage and skill won their respect. At Gaines' Mill, during the Seven Days' Campaign, a rifle ball shattered his leg, disabling him for 2 months. Returning to his regiment, he led his men at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and received his promotion to Brigadier General on June 1, 1864. He temporarily commanded 2 brigades in succession, seeing action in the Petersburg Campaign, and in late summer 1864 was permanently assigned command of Major General Joseph B. Kershaw's old brigade of South Carolinians. On October 13, in a skirmish near Cedar Creek, he lost the leg that had been broken at a Gaines' Mill, but resumed the command of the brigade until the war's end. Returning to his native state after the war, he took up his law practice and entered politics, allying himself with his old commander, Hampton, and was elected state's attorney general. He later died in Richmond, Virginia. Family links:
Spouse:
Sallie Enders Conner (1845 - 1928)*

Children:
Henry W. Conner (1867 - 1938)*
Mary Enders Conner Moffett (1869 - 1950)*
Julia Courtney Conner (1871 - 1958)*
Nannie Conner Young (1878 - 1964)*
Caroline Conner (1882 - 1974)* Burial:
Magnolia Cemetery
Charleston
Charleston County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-maxcy-gregg.jpg]1180
Maxcy Gregg, born in 1814 in Columbia, S.C., was later educated at South Carolina College in Columbia. One of the Confedracy's most intelligent and cultured men, Gregg's diverse knowledge and interests included philosophy, Greek drama, astronomy, botany, and ornithology. After passing the bar, Gregg practiced law with his father in Columbia for many years except for the short time he served in the Mexican War. The prominent and influential bachelor was an avid secessionist and a member of South Carolina's secession convention. When his state withdrew from for Union, Gregg was instrumental in organizing the 1st South Carolina Volunteers. The regiment, under Colonel Gregg, included 27 physicians, 30 lawyers, and many prominent businessmen.

Commissioned brigadier general on December 14, 1861, Gregg led the leading brigade of Gen. Ambrose P. Hill's Light Division in the Battle of Gaines's Mill on June 27, 1862. The advance of his five regiments was, according to Hill, "the handsomest charge in line I have seen during the War." But the Yankees were well positioned and over the course of the Seven Days' campaign, Gregg's regiments suffered 939 casualties.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-states-rights-gist.jpg]1150
Brig Gen States Rights Gist Birth:Sep. 3, 1831
Death:Nov. 30, 1864

Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. He was born in Union, South Carolina, and was a graduate of South Carolina College and the Harvard University Law School. An attorney in his home state, he became active in the militia, and rose to state Brigadier General in 1859. His brother Joseph was also a Brigadier of the militia and was a Major in the Fifteenth South Carolina. His cousin, William Henry Gist, was Governor of South Carolina during the war. Governor Gist's son, William, was also a Major of the Fifteenth and was killed in action at Knoxville. Knowing that war was on the horizon, he prepared South Carolinians for war. After South Carolina seceded, as state adjutant and inspector general he acquired arms for and oversaw the bombardment of Fort Sumter. As a volunteer aide to South Carolina Brigadier General Barnard E. Bee, he witnessed the First Battle of Bull Run, and on Bee's death the day after the battle assumed temporary command of his brigade. After returning to South Carolina and duties as adjutant general, he received appointment as a Confederate Brigadier General on March 20, 1862, and was sent to state coastal defenses commanded by Major General John C. Pemberton. On Pemberton's encirclement at Vicksburg, Mississippi, he joined General Joseph Johnston's failed relief expedition to the city. His reassignment to the Army of Tennessee and combat duty at Chickamauga, Chattanooga, and the battle for Atlanta followed. He commanded a brigade in Major General John C. Brown's division during General John B. Hood's Franklin and Nashville Campaign. In the assault on the Federal center at the Battle of Franklin, while leading his troops on foot, he was killed, thus becoming 1 of 6 Confederate generals to die as a result of the fight. Family links:
Parents:
Nathaniel Gist (1776 - 1861)
Elizabeth Lewis McDaniel Gist (1796 - 1859)

Spouse:
Jane Margaret Adams Brooks (1841 - 1911)* Cause of death: Killed in battle

Search Amazon for States Gist

Burial:
Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Cemetery
Columbia
Richland County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-stephen-elliott-jr.jpg]1090
Brig Gen Stephen Elliott, Jr Birth:Oct. 26, 1830
Death:Feb. 21, 1866

Brigadier General, Confederate States Army. Pre-war served in the South Carolina Legislature and Captained the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery. Elliott was badly wounded in the battle of the Crater. Later he was wounded again near Bentonville. General Elliot was elected to the legislature at war's end, but exhausted by wounds and exposure, survived a few months.

Family links:
Spouse:
Sarah Gibbes DeSaussure Elliott (1811 - 1891)*

Children:
Louis DeSaussure Elliott (1854 - 1859)* Burial:
Saint Helenas Episcopal Churchyard
Beaufort
Beaufort County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-thomas-fenwick-drayton.jpg]640
Brig Gen Thomas Fenwick Drayton Birth:Aug. 24, 1808
Death:Feb. 18, 1891

Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. He graduated from West Point in 1828, where he formed a lifelong friendship with Jefferson Finis Davis. In 1836, Drayton resigned his commission from the Army, to run his plantation and served as South Carolina State Legislator. When the Civil War began, Confederate President Jefferson Finis Davis commissioned him a Brigadier General in September 1861. Placed in command of the military district at Port Royal, South Carolina, he was unable to defend the post against a Union Naval attack. He led his brigade at the Battles of Bull Run, South Mountain and Antietam. In 1863, he was assigned in command of the Trans-Mississippi Department, led a brigade in the District of Arkansas and later commanded the Sub-district of Texas. After the war, he became a farmer in Georgia, then moved to North Carolina, where he worked as a life insurance agent. Family links:
Parents:
William Drayton (1776 - 1846)
Anna Drayton Gadsen (1780 - 1813) Burial:
Elmwood Cemetery
Charlotte
Mecklenburg County
North Carolina, USA
Plot: Section H, Lot 56 E1/2, Grave 1
GPS (lat/lon): 35.235, -80.84748
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-gen-wilmot-gibbes-de-saussure-4th-brigade-sc-state-militia.jpg]640
Brig Gen Wilmot Gibbes De Saussure 4th Brigade SC State Militia Birth:Jul. 23, 1822, USA
Death:Feb. 1, 1886

General of South Carolina State Militia. He served as the Secretary of the South Carolina Treasury and as a Representative to the State Assembly. Appointed to Brigadier General of State Militia in 1861, De Saussure led the 4th Brigade throughout the Civil War. He served on South Carolina Governor Francis Pickens cabinet as Secretary of the Treasury. In 1862, he was elected State Adjutant General and Inspector General of Militia. Post Civil War saw De Saussure resuming his profession as a lawyer and becoming the President of the Huguenot Society and the Sons of Cincinnati. The General died in Ocala, Florida on February 1, 1886. (bio by: Stonewall)

Family links:
Children:
Susan B DeSaussure Kershaw (1847 - 1924)* Burial:
Magnolia Cemetery
Charleston
Charleston County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_brig-general-micah-jenkins-6th-sc.jpg]640
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-alexander-campbell-earle-co-b-4th-sc-inf.jpg]810
Capt Alexander Campbell Earle Co B 4th SC Inf Birth:1841
Death:Dec. 10, 1916

EARLE, ALEXANDER CAMPBELL
(1841~1916)

Alexander Campbell Earle, co-founder of the Delta Tau Delta Fraternity and Confederate veteran, was born in South Carolina in 1841.

Prior to the Civil War, Earle attended Bethany College in Virginia, where he co-founded the Delta Tau Delta Fraternity.

After the Civil War broke out, he left Bethany and returned to Anderson, and enlisted as a private in Company B of the 4th South Carolina Infantry. The 4th Infantry was organized at Anderson in March, 1861, and was soon moved to Virginia, where the men fought at the Battle of First Manassas.

The men of the 4th Infantry typically enlisted for only six months or a year's service, and, by March, 1862, were mustering out of the army. With so many men leaving, the regiment, in April, 1862, was consolidated into five companies and renamed the 4th South Carolina Battalion.

Earle does not appear to have served in the 4th Battalion, as he formed his own company, of which he was elected captain, A. C. Earle's Company, South Carolina Cavalry.

Following the War, Earle moved to Arkansas and in 1872, he moved to Texas. He eventually settled in Campbell, Hunt County, where he worked as a carpenter.

On March 19, 1915, following his wife's death, he moved to Austin to live in the Confederate Men's Home, where he died on December 10, 1916.

Delta Tau Delta erected his headstone and the Gamma Iota Chapter of the fraternity at the University of Texas at Austin still makes annual pilgrimages to his grave. Burial:
Texas State Cemetery
Austin
Travis County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section:Confederate Field, Section 3 Row:J Number:18
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-andrew-patterson-calhoun-campbell-co-g-18th-sc-vol-inf.jpg]730
Capt Andrew Patterson Calhoun Campbell Birth:May 13, 1827
Death:Jul. 30, 1892

Captain Andrew Patterson Calhoun Campbell, the son of Isaac Alexander & Margaret Campbell. He grew up in the Bethel Community just north of present-day Clover, South Carolina. He was educated at Bethel Academy & married Mary McMakin. He fathered eleven children, many before the call to arms. With the declaration of Secession, Andrew went with his brother Samuel to Charleston to enlist and was commissioned Captain in Company G of the 18th South Carolina Volunteers (The Mountain Guards). Although details are unclear, it is thought he had already begun the practice of medicine before obtaining his commission as he is listed as one of the acting surgeons of the 18th SCV. His serviced ended on May 5, 1862, and he returned to his home in Bethel Community to continue the practice of medicine. Dr. Andrew Campbell was the first and only doctor in Clover, South Carolina in the years following the War. He practiced for over 40 years in this area until the time of his death in 1892.

Burial:
Woodside Cemetery
Clover
York County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-james-dugan-gist.jpg]690
Capt James Dugan "Jim" Gist Birth:Jun. 12, 1833, USA
Death:Aug. 23, 1863
Mississippi, USA

Military- CW-CSA Cpt.in brother States Rights Gist unit.
CSA
'Memento Mori'
Confederate Soldier
James was 30 years old

James was the Brother of:

1-Louise Sarah Gist- Apr.18,1814 - Apr.15,1815

2-Sarah Francis Gist- Apr.7,1816 - Oct.31,1868
Husband-John Gist

3-Joseph Fincher Gist- Oct.11,1818 - Oct.6,1890

4- Nathaniel Gist Jr.- July 28,1820 -Dec.9,1864
wife- Mary McDaniel

5-Thomas McDaniel Gist- Nov.13,1822- died abt.1887 in Ark.
Wife-Mary Boggan

6-John Cornelius Gist- June 28,1824- May 19,1869

7-William Crawford Gist- May 3,1827- Aug. 1875
Wife-Frances Dorothy Caroline Crenshaw

8- Robert Thaddeus Gist- May 3,1829- Sept. 2, 1871


9-Brigadier General States Rights Gist-Sept.3,1831- Nov.30,1864
Wife Jane Adams


A good Man that should be remembered...

Family links:
Parents:
Nathaniel Gist (1776 - 1861)
Elizabeth Lewis McDaniel Gist (1796 - 1859)

Burial:
Fair Forest Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Jonesville (Union County)
Union County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-jesse-k-brockman-co-b-13th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]690
Capt Jesse K Brockman Birth:unknown
Death:May 28, 1864
Spotsylvania
Spotsylvania County
Virginia, USA

Company B, 13th South Carolina Infantry, Perrin's Brigade, Wilcox's Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A.

Residence Spartansburg; 24 years old; brother of Colonel Benjamin Thomas Brockman. Enlisted (date unknown), he was commissioned into "B" Co." SC 13th Infantry as 1st Lieutenant.
Promoted 1862 to Captain.
Mortally Wounded In Action 5/12/1864 in the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House, as was his brother, who died 6/8/1864.

The 13th Infantry Regiment was organized in July, 1861, at Lightwoodknot Springs, near Columbia, South Carolina. Many of the men were recruited in Greenville, Newberry, Abbeville, and Spartanburg counties.
The unit sustained 63 casualties at The Wilderness, 86 casualties at Spotsylvania. Burial:
Spotsylvania Confederate Cemetery
Spotsylvania
Spotsylvania County
Virginia, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-joseph-wesley-beamguard-co-g-18th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]700
Capt Joseph Wesley Beamguard Birth:May 21, 1832
Fairfield County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Mar. 14, 1887
Clover
York County
South Carolina, USA

During the Civil War he enlisted 1-1-1862, as a 2nd Lieut in the 18th Regiment, SCV, Co. G, Mountain Guards. He was elected Captain May 1862. He was wounded in the battle for Second Manassas in 1862. He was again wounded in battle in 1863. He was retired by order of the secretary of war 8/8/1864, to the invalid corps, due to his wounds. His unit saw heavy action in the Virginia Campaign. After the war he returned to his farm in York County SC. He married Louisa Desdemona Catherine Stephenson on 12-22-1857.

Family links:
Parents:
Godfrey Beamguard (1784 - 1839)
Susannah Edmonds Beamguard (1791 - 1856)

Children:
Corrie Alice Beamguard Caldwell (1858 - 1899)*
Elizabeth Eugenia Beamguard Wood (1861 - 1928)*
Mary Lee Beamguard Pursley (1863 - 1940)*
William Tolen Beamguard (1865 - 1935)*
James Emmett Beamguard (1869 - 1968)*
Roland Thomas Beamguard (1872 - 1954)*
Samuel Bunyan Beamguard (1875 - 1965)*
Minnie L Beamguard Parrott (1881 - 1969)*Burial:
Woodside Cemetery
Clover
York County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-langdon-cheves-jr.jpg]540
Capt Langdon Cheves, Jr Birth:1814
Pennsylvania, USA
Death:Jul. 10, 1863

Civil War Confederate Officer. Born into an upper echelon aristocrat family, he was the son of Langdon Cheves, Sr. As an intellectual, he quickly came to the realization that civil war was inescapable in 1861. From his own wealth, he procured arms and equipment for the strengthening and defense of the coastal regions of South Carolina and Georgia. Further, he employed his engineering background to design and supervise the construction of the "Gazelle", a hot-air balloon for observation. Constructed of imported silk, the Gazelle was relocated to Richmond, Virginia and subsequently was used throughout the June, 1862 Battle of Seven Pines for the purposes of the Confederate military. In 1862, General John Clifford Pemberton, commander of the Department of South Carolina and Georgia, arranged the construction of Morris Island Battery on Morris Island, South Carolina (the battery would become known as Battery Wagner after its namesake, Lt. Colonel Thomas M. Wagner, was killed). Cheves was solicited to oversee the choosing of the location, the engineering and construction of Battery Wagner. The garrison would become paramount in the defense of Charleston against the land forces of General Quincy Adams Gillmore and the naval forces of Rear-Admiral John Adolphus Bernard Dahlgren. It was only the evacuation of Confederate forces on September 6, 1863, that the Federals were to become the holders of it. Cheves was one of the many deaths that occurred during the defense and assaults of Battery Wagner. On July 10, 1863, he was "sitting in his quarters overwhelmed with grief at the tidings just brought to him of the death of his nephew, Captain Charles T. Haskell, Jr." Upon hearing the communication of an imminent attack by Union Naval forces, "he roused himself to action" and was killed instantly on the ramparts of Battery Wagner from the first shell hurled from an attacking Union Monitor. After receiving the forbidding news of the death of her husband, his wife lamented; "I know not how I shall live without him".




Family links:
Parents:
Langdon Cheves (1776 - 1857)
Mary Elizabeth Dulles Cheves (1789 - 1836)

Spouse:
Charlotte Lorain McCord Cheves (1819 - 1879)* Burial:
Magnolia Cemetery
Charleston
Charleston County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-robert-william-frick-co-i-15th-sc-inf.jpg]550
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_capt-william-james-gooding-co-d-24th-sc-inf.jpg]520
Capt William James Gooding Co D 24th SC Inf Birth:Nov. 9, 1835
Barnwell County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Feb. 9, 1912
Hampton
Hampton County
South Carolina, USA

Children:
Mahalia E. (born 1858, Prince William Parish, Beaufort District, SC)
William James Jr. (born January 1868, Prince William Parish, Beaufort District, SC)
Addie H. (born 1870, Prince William Parish, Beaufort District, SC)
Percy Hammond (born February 9, 1875, SC)

William James Gooding of Crocketville, Hampton county, South Carolina, member of the state legislature from 1858 to 1861; sheriff of Beaufort district, 1866 to 1868; county treasurer of Beaufort county, 1877 to 1878; treasurer of Hampton county, 1878 to 1880, and a member of the Constitutional convention in 1895,?was born near the Savannah river in Barnwell county, South Carolina, on the 9th of November, 1835.

His father, James Alexander Gooding, was a planter who had served from 1840 to 1848 as tax collector for Prince William parish in the Beaufort district, and is remembered throughout that region for his fair dealing and his industrious, upright life. He traced his descent from Thomas Gooding, who came from England about the middle of the seventeenth century and settled at Dighton, Massachusetts. His mother was Mrs. Mahala (Gray) Gooding.

A sturdy and vigorous boy, passing his early years in the country, he was fond of study and equally fond of out-of-door sports. While still a small boy he was taught all kinds of farm work which he had the strength to undertake; and while he was not constantly engaged in this work, he grew through boyhood to manhood, developed and trained by working with his hands, until he was familiar with all kinds of labor on the farm and knew something about managing other laborers. Meanwhile he had attended the home schools and Ligon's academy, at Sandy Run, Lexington district, South Carolina. He passed one year in the South Carolina Military academy, at Columbia, South Carolina; but his father's death made it necessary for him to return to his home in order to help his mother in the management of the plantation. His opportunities for regular attendance at school were thus shortened, but he had acquired a taste for study and for reading ancient as well as modern history; and throughout his life he has shown an interest not merely in the current news, but also in the current literature of the land.

In 1857 he established himself as an independent farmer in Beaufort (now Hampton) county. He took an active interest in the discussions which preceded the outbreak of the War between the States. In speaking of his life, he says that he was "drawn to choose planting and farming as a profession, because the country offered at that time few occupations outside of agriculture ; and love of country life, with the independence assured the farmer, together with the examples of men who, while they lived by managing farms and plantations, had risen to eminence in various walks of life, led him to make it his constant hope and endeavor to be a useful citizen of his state as well as a farmer." Two years after he established himself in Beaufort county he was elected by his fellow-citizens to represent Prince William parish in the state legislature, filling this position from 1858 to the outbreak of the war in 1861. In the militia of South Carolina he had served as adjutant of the Twelfth regiment of infantry from 1856 to 1858, and as major and lieutenant-colonel of the same regiment from 1858 to 1861. Becoming a volunteer in the Confederate army, he served as the Captain of Company D of the Twenty-fourth South Carolina Volunteer Infantry Regiment, resigning in 1862. From 1863 to 1865 he served as lieutenant in Company D, Eleventh South Carolina infantry. He was severely wounded in the head on the 9th of May, 1864, in the engagement of Swift Creek, between Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia; and as a consequence he was detailed for duty in the war tax department as assessor of war taxes for Beaufort district, South Carolina, in the winter of 1864, and he served there until the close of the war.

In 1866 he was elected sheriff of the Beaufort district, serving until 1868. Nine years later he was chosen treasurer of Beaufort county, filling that position from 1877 to 1878, and he was treasurer of Hampton county from 1878 to 1880.

A Democrat in politics, he was county chairman of the Democratic party from 1882 to 1886; and he was a member of the Democratic state committee during the same years. In 1895 he was elected a member of the Constitutional convention of South Carolina, taking an active part in the work of that convention. During the forty years from 1856 to 1895 he served on many local boards in various capacities, evincing a public spirit and an interest in the public welfare which led to his choice by his fellow-citizens repeatedly for such positions.

Of his religious convictions he says: "In my youth I favored the Baptists, but I now prefer the Presbyterians, although I am not affiliated with either."

On the 4th of September, 1856, he married Miss Elizabeth Annie Terry, daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Terry, of Beaufort district. She died on the 22d of May, 1894. Of their four children, two sons and two daughters, all are living in 1907.

He is a Mason and has been master of his lodge, and he was at one time a Dictator in the Knights of Honor, although he is not now affiliated with either of these orders. His favorite forms of exercise and recreation have been fishing, shooting, "and a little work and study."

To the young he commends "a definite object set before one for attainment; truthfulness; honesty; and healthful physical exercise in congenial work." (Provided by Kenneth Robinson III).

Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Ann Terry Gooding (1833 - 1894)*

Children:
Mary Webb Gooding Rabey (1896 - 1993)* Burial:
Crocketville Cemetery
Crocketville
Hampton County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-benjamin-thomas-brockman-13th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]520
Col. Benjamin Thomas Brockman Birth:Dec. 11, 1831
Greenville County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Jun. 8, 1864
Richmond
Richmond City
Virginia, USA

Confederate Army Officer; A Spartanburg, South Carolina, merchant at the start of the Civil War, he enlisted in the 13th South Carolina Regiment in 1861 and became a Captain. He had been promoted to Major by the time he was wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas in 1862, and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and, later, Colonel in 1863. After receiving severe head and arm wounds at Spotsylvania Courthouse on May 12, 1864, he was transfered to a Richmond hospital where he died from complications following the amputation of his left arm. Burial:
Hollywood Cemetery
Richmond
Richmond City
Virginia, USA
Plot: Confederate Officers' Section
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-david-mcintosh-lt-edward-mcintosh.jpg]570
Col. David McIntosh & Lt. Edward McIntosh were CSA Soldiers from Society Hill, SC. Pictured here during the WBTS
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-henry-laurens-benbow-23rd-sc-inf.jpg]610
Col Henry Laurens Benbow Birth:1829
Death:1906

Colonel Henry Laurens Benbow
23rd Regiment SOUTH CAROLINE INFANTRY
(1829 - 1906)
Henry Laurens Benbow entered Hatch's Battalion of Coast Rangers as a captain. Hatch's Battalion later became the 23rd South Carolina Infantry. He was promoted to full colonel a little over a year later. He was wounded at Second Manassas and wouded at Petersburg. At the Battle of Five Forks, Benbow was again wounded. Shot through both thighs, he was captured and ended the war as a Federal prisoner.




Burial:
Manning Cemetery
Manning
Clarendon County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-john-logan-black-1st-sc-cav.jpg]490
Col John Logan Black Birth:Jul. 12, 1830
York County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Mar. 25, 1902
Blacksburg
Cherokee County
South Carolina, USA

Confederate officer. Attended the United States Military Academy. Lt. Col., 1st South Carolina Cavalry - October 31, 1861; Colonel - June 25, 1862. Wounded at Upperville and Brandy Station - June 1863. Mining magnate and planter after the war in Blacksburg.



Burial:
Aimwell Cemetery
Blacksburg
Cherokee County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-john-s-green.jpg]430
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-joseph-newton-brown.jpg]430
Col Joseph Newton Brown Birth:Dec. 16, 1832
Death:Jan. 24, 1920

Civil War Confederate Officer.

Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Louisa Bruce Brown (____ - 1917)*

Children:
Varina Davis Brown (____ - 1947)* Burial:
Silver Brook Cemetery
Anderson
Anderson County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-oliver-e-edwards-13th-sc-inf.jpg]410
Col Oliver E. Edwards 13th SC Inf. Birth:unknown
Death:Jun. 21, 1863

Oliver E. Edwards
Residence was not listed;
Enlisted as a Colonel (date unknown).
Field & Staff SC 13th Infantry
d. 6/21/63
(He was from the Spartansburg District)




Burial:
Willow Dale Cemetery
Goldsboro
Wayne County
North Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-w-j-crawley-co-d-holcombe-legion-sc.jpg]540
Col W J Crawley Co D Holcombe Legion SC Birth:Nov. 6, 1833
Death:Jan. 29, 1902

CDR
Holcombe Legion SC Co. D

Burial:
Wrightsboro Cemetery
McDuffie County
Georgia, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-william-barry-allison.jpg]510
Birth:Jan. 28, 1816
Death:Nov. 13, 1896

William Barry Allison was born in the Beersheba section of York County. He was the son of Hugh Allison III and Violet Barry. He was a great-grandson of Hugh Allison, Sr., who was born in Scotland in 1714, and came to America on September 13, 1736. William Barry Allison bought a plantation on the headwaters of Little Allison Creek in 1845, and married Mary Susan Currence on October 6, 1846.

William B. Allison enlisted on January 1, 1862 at Camp Hamilton South Carolina in the Confederate States Army and served as Lieutenant Colonel with the 18th South Carolina Volunteers. He took part in campaigns in Georgia, Florida, Mississippi and was in heavy fighting around Petersburg and Richmond, Virginia. He was paroled April 9, 1865 at Appomattox Virginia. Following the war, Colonel Allison returned to his farm and was known throughout the county for his work as a surveyor. Family links:
Parents:
Hugh Allison (1783 - 1849)
Violet Barry Allison (1792 - 1851)

Spouse:
Mary Susan Currence Allison (1829 - 1902)

Children:
William Barry Allison (1860 - 1897)* Burial:
Allison Creek Presbyterian Church Cemetery
York
York County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-william-davie-desaussure-15th-sc-inf.jpg]450
Col William Davie DeSaussure 15th SC Inf Birth:Dec. 12, 1819
Columbia
Richland County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Jul. 2, 1863
Gettysburg
Adams County
Pennsylvania, USA

William Davie Desaussure was born in Columbia, South Carolina, on December 12, 1819, graduated from South Carolina College, and worked as a lawyer. He served in the Mexican War and with the state legislature prior to the war. William also served in the U. S. Army from 1846-1848, and 1855 to 1861. He was commissioned a captain with the Provincial Army of the Confederate States, on March 16, 1861, and then colonel of the 15th South Carolina Infantry, on September 9, 1861.

According to General Joseph B. Kershaw, DeSaussure fell some paces in front of the line, with sword drawn, leading the 15th South Carolina advance. DeSaussure had been shot through the chest.

DeSaussure's body was first buried at the Francis Bream Farm, in the Old McClelland Family Cemetery, on Black Horse Tavern Road. The remains were sent to Richmond, Va. in 1871, buried in Hollywood Cemetery. His body was later removed and interred in the First Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Columbia, South Carolina.

Burial:
McClelland Cemetery
Adams County
Pennsylvania, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_col-william-giroud-burt-22nd-sc-inf.jpg]450
Col. William Giroud Burt Birth:Feb. 11, 1843
Edgefield
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Aug. 29, 1890
Bossier Parish
Louisiana, USA

Colonel, 22nd SC Infantry C.S.A.
Proud Confederate Soldier

Burial:
Bellevue Cemetery
Bossier Parish
Louisiana, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_corp-collin-postell-hucks-co-a-26th-sc-inf.jpg]480
Corp. Collin Postell Hucks 1840-1921 served in Co A, 26th SC Infantry, CSA & wife Emma Jenkins 1844-1925 of Horry County, SC. C. P. Hucks was also a POW at Point Lookout, MD for several months & was released June 28, 1865. His shoes were taken away & he had to walk all the way to SC barefoot. He did make it home, got married in 1866 & raised a large family in the Horry Section (Hucks Rd., Aynor, SC). He was one of 5 brothers that served in the war. He & two others were the only survivors. Photo taken in 1916 at their 50th wedding anniversary.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_corp-jefferson-f-ballew.jpg]420
Birth:1819
Death:unknown

Cpl Jefferson F. Ballew/Bellew
Co. H, 22nd SC
NOTE: From Darrell Wallace we received the following information.
Jefferson spelled his name Ballew and the Confederate records all record Bellew. According to the 1850 census of Glassy Mountain township of Greeville County South Carolina Jefferson was 31 years old and lived with his wife Charlotte and three daughters, Martha, Sara Jane and Mary and his mother Nancy age 55. This would put his birthdate in the year 1819.
The date of his death or approximate date is somewhere recorded in the Charleston newspaper (Charleston, S.C.) after July 31, 1862 as this was the date of the last letter that we have of him. In my mother's Bible it was recorded that he was killed at Petersburg, VA. but we now know this was faulty information. As a matter of information, he had two sons, the older, Joseph Walker born in 1854 and the younger, Benjamin born in 1855.

Family links:
Spouse:
Charlotte Chastain Ballew (1825 - 1871)*

Children:
Martha Ballew Dill (1844 - 1928)*
Sara Jane Ballew Clark (1846 - 1920)*
Mary Ann Ballew Dobbins (1849 - 1921)*
Joseph Walker Balliew (1854 - 1928)* Family links:
Spouse:
Charlotte Chastain Ballew (1825 - 1871)*

Children:
Martha Ballew Dill (1844 - 1928)*
Sara Jane Ballew Clark (1846 - 1920)*
Mary Ann Ballew Dobbins (1849 - 1921)*
Joseph Walker Balliew (1854 - 1928)* Burial:
Our Soldiers Cemetery
Mount Jackson
Shenandoah County
Virginia, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_council-evander-collins.jpg]560
Council Evander Collins of Florence County, SC was a CSA Soldier during the WBTS (1861-1865).
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_dargan-daniel-co-d-25th-sc-inf.jpg]410
Dargan Daniel Co D 25th SC Inf. Birth:Nov. 14, 1850
Dillon
Dillon County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Sep. 1, 1927
Dillon County
South Carolina, USA

Dargan Daniel is the son of Nathaniel and Delia Huggins Daniel. At the age of 14 he joined the Confederate Army in 1864 and served with his older brother, Harllee, in Co. D, 25th South Carolina Infantry. He was discharged in 1865. He was married to Elizabeth Surles and had several children. He was a farmer until his death. He is buried along with his wife in Dillon County,SC at Pleasant Grove Baptist Church.

Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth A. Surles Daniels (1852 - 1939)*

Children:
C. Liston Daniels (1872 - 1923)*
Andrew Harley Daniels (1875 - 1951)*
Wade Hampton Daniels (1877 - 1902)*
Caroline Daniels Morris (1884 - 1972)*
John Ellis Daniels (1889 - 1949)*
John Murry Daniels (1889 - 1938)*
Katie Elizabeth Daniels Carter (1890 - 1960)*
Lewis Daniels (1892 - 1970)*
Flora Jane Daniels Huggins (1894 - 1964)* Burial:
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Cemetery
Dillon
Dillon County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_david-wyatt-aiken.jpg]460
Birth:Mar. 17, 1828
Winnsboro
Fairfield County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Apr. 6, 1887
Cokesbury
Greenwood County
South Carolina, USA

Civil War Confederate Army Officer, US Congressman. He served in the Civil War as Colonel and commander of the 7th South Carolina Infantry, which he led in the Sring 1862 Peninsular Campaign, the September 17, 1862 Battle of Antietam (where he was shot through the lungs) and during the July 1863 Battle of Gettysburg, where his unit saw severe action in the Peach Orchard. His wounds forced him from field duty, and he eventually resigned his commission in 1864. After the war he served in the South Carolina state legislature, and was elected to represent South Carolina's 3rd District in the United States House of Representatives He served from 1877 to 1887, and died soon after leaving office. He was the father of South Carolina Congressman Wyatt Aiken, and the first cousin to South Carolina Governor and Senator William Aiken.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_dr-moses-clayton-cox-co-e-3rd-battalion-sc.jpg]380
Dr Moses Clayton Cox Co E 3rd Battalion SC Birth:Feb. 19, 1836
Death:Dec. 17, 1907
Lanford
Laurens County
South Carolina, USA

Moses was a Dr. in the Civil War, Company E3 Battalion CSA. He was kicked in the head by a horse or mule, causing his death. Cemetery located on Bramlett Church Rd. First married to Rebecca Martin and secondly Louvinia E Bates. Known children: Veleria, Fila, Clayton, Arthur, Max, Alphine and Collier Drummond Cox. Known brothers and sisters: John Spurgeon Cox, Drury S Cox, Sally (Sarah) Malinda Cox and Mary Malinda Cox. Moses was the son of Drury Cox and the daughter of John & Nancy Spurgeon.

Family links:
Spouse:
L E Cox (1838 - 1913)* Burial:
Martin Cemetery
Laurens County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_edward-waldo-fant.jpg]380
Edward Waldo Fant Birth:Jul. 17, 1840
Townville
Anderson County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Jul. 28, 1913
Cass County
Texas, USA


Family links:
Parents:
James Reddish Fant (1789 - 1866)
Anna Hughey Fant (1798 - 1856)

Spouses:
Sarah Caroline Simmons Fant (1842 - 1885)
Anna Corrine Lemmon Fant (1850 - 1934)*

Children:
Charles Waldo Fant (1859 - 1863)*
Anna Martha Fant (1861 - 1863)*
James Cicero Fant (1866 - 1923)*
George Washington Fant (1868 - 1932)*
Lury Ann Fant Cox (1870 - 1946)*
Eliza Jane Fant (1870 - 1870)*
Samuel David *** Fant (1872 - 1945)*
Robert Edward Fant (1876 - 1956)*
Roy Perry Fant (1878 - 1959)*
Cary Buckner Fant (1880 - 1958)*
Eunice Ada Fant Dodd (1883 - 1962)*
Burial:
Lanier Friendship BC Cemetery
Lanier
Cass County
Texas, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_george-lewis-cauthen.jpg]390
Birth:Jul. 5, 1839
Death:Aug. 5, 1922

George Lewis Cauthen, son of Little George Cauthen and Nancy Beckham. Husband of Elizabeth Rebecca Bowers.


Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Rebecca Bowers Cauthen (1840 - 1917)*

Children:
Jane Roseanna Cauthen Gainer (1865 - 1943)*
George William Cauthen (1868 - 1936)*
James Andrew Cauthen (1870 - 1966)*
Jesse Barbar Cauthen (1875 - 1955)*
J Irvin Cauthen (1880 - 1950)* Burial:
Salem Cemetery
Heath Springs
Lancaster County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_henry-marlow-co-e-10th-sc-inf.jpg]400
Henry Marlow of Horry County, SC. 10th SC Inf. Co. E. POW at Rock Island.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_henry-uncle-dad-brown-21st-regt-sc-inf.jpg]390
Henry "Uncle Dad" Brown Birth:1830
South Carolina, USA
Death:Nov. 2, 1907
Darlington
Darlington County
South Carolina, USA

Excerpts from "The Darlington Press", November 1907

DEATH OF HENRY BROWN

Drummer of Darlington Guards And Well Known And Highly Respected Colored Man

On Saturday afternoon the old drummer Henry Brown, well known colored man, passed away. ...the Darlington Guards assembled at their armory and marched to the house under arms. There the Captain was requested to detail pall bearers from the ranks, which he did.

When the body was brought out, the company stood at present arms. The line of march was then taken up to the church. ...When the church was reached a representative five number of the white citizens of the town acting as pall bearers took the body into the church the Company again presenting arms.

The colored Masons...took its way to the cemetery where the rest of the masonic ritual was given...the bugler Mr. Angus Gainey sounded "taps" very softly and the Company fired three rounds over the grave. Should the stranger in our gates ask, "What mean ye by this service. Why should white people thus pay honor to a colored man?" The answer would be because he was a man. In life he was faithful to every trust, his word was his bond and not only were his friends numbered among those who live in Darlington but wherever he was known and that was throughout the length and breadth of the State.

The grave was covered with beautiful flowers, the offerings of his friends, both white and colored. Only in the South where the negro is known and appreciated could such a demonstration could have been seen, it was a cordial recognition of the worth of a citizen of this county whose death was a loss to the community.



Tribute to Henry Brown From Gen. W.E. James, Who Knew Him Well

On Saturday evening Henry Brown, a most highly respected colored man, died. He had lived a long life and had been one of the land marks of this community, and from his conservative and upright life he had commanded the respect of both white and colored people. ...The Darlington Guards in full uniform with arms marched to his late residence and were placed in front of the hearse...it was determined that a number of white gentlemen should act as pall bearers---should take charge of the body and attend it from his residence to the colored Presbyterian church of which he was a member. Arriving at the church the Guards presented arms and the white pall bearers took it into the church...

Henry Brown came from Camden and had been a free man all his life...When the War broke out Henry Brown went with the Darlington Guards...and remained with that company until the 1st Regiment was disbanded. He then went with the 8th Regiment to Virginia as the drummer for that regiment. He was regularly enlisted in Company E...and he remained with that regiment till its reorganization in 1862, when all above the age of thirty-five were discharged....on the 21st of July '61 the regiment was stationed at Mitchels Ford on the South side of Bull Run. The battle began two miles above and at 12 o'clock the regiment was ordered to go where the battle was raging. As soon as the order came Henry began to beat the long roll. This indicated to a battery on the other side of the Run the position of the regiment and the shells began to fall thick and fast. It was some time before the Colonel could stop him but he was beating all the time regardless of the danger. He followed on to the battlefield and was under fire with the others.

After leaving the 8th regiment he joined Capt. S.H. Wilds' company and remained with the 21st S.C. regiment to the close of the war.

When...the reconstruction period began... Henry was given the office of Coroner, which he held for a while, but when he saw the injuries that were being done to the white people by those men who were in office, he allied himself with the white people and remained so for the rest of his life. When Camp Darlington No. 785 U.C.V. was organized he had his name enrolled and never missed a reunion...He prided himself on being a Veteran and took great interest in the camp. We shall miss him. He has gone to join the great majority of those who marched to the tap of his drum. But we, too, shall soon follow them.

W.E. James

Burial:
Black Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Darlington
Darlington County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_hilliard-todd-co-k-1st-sc-artillery.jpg]470
Hilliard Todd
1844 - Jan. 27, 1902
wife: Nancy Lee, Aug. 24, 1845 - Feb. 16, 1930
Nine children

The Horry Herald ? Thursday, February 13, 1902
Mr. Hyliard Todd, aged about 60 years, departed this life Jan. 27th 1902.
Mr. Todd was an old Confederate veteran who was wounded several times but survived. He was a hard working man and leaves much sign where he has been. He was living near Eldorado, S. C. and was entered at the Pond Field grave yard.
He will be greatly missed in his neighborhood. He leaves a wife and eight children to mourn after him.
A Friend.

Wounded in the leg (left?)

Compiled Confederate Service Records.
Todd-Hilliard, Co. B, Manigault?s Battalion SC Artillery ? SC Siege Train ? 18th Battalion SC Artillery: in private/out private; enlisted at age 18, on April 15, 1862 in Horry District, SC for the war, by Captain Charles Alston, Jr.; April 14 to June 30, 1862-present; July/August 1862-absent on sick furlough-went to Horry District Aug. 21, 1862; Sept/Oct 1862 discharged Sept. 20, 1862.

Todd-Hilliard, Co. K, 1st SC Artillery: in private/out private; enlisted July 18, 1864 at Camp Instruction-Columbia, SC by Major Green, for the war, entitled to pay from July 14, 1864. July/Aug 1864 ? present; Sept/Oct 1864 ? present; Nov/Dec 1864 ? present.
Buried: Pond Field Graveyard, Horry County, SC.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_isaac-ball.jpg]330
Birth:Apr. 21, 1844
South Carolina, USA
Death:Mar. 26, 1933
Charleston
Charleston County
South Carolina, USA

A Confederate soldier. Died at 35 Meeting St., Charleston, South Carolina. Listed at Isaac Barr in death records.

Family links:
Parents:
William James Ball (1821 - 1891)
Julia Cart Ball (1823 - 1858)

Spouse:
Mary Louisa Moultrie Ball (1846 - 1926)

Children:
Isaac Ball (1870 - 1946)*
Julia Cart Ball Ficken (1872 - 1964)*
William Moultrie Ball (1873 - 1937)*
James Austin Ball (1875 - 1956)*
Loti Moultrie Ball Rhett (1878 - 1965)*
Francis Guerin Ball (1880 - 1880)*
Alexander Kelsall Ball (1883 - 1958)*
Sarah Harleston Ball Townsend (1888 - 1979)*
Charlotte Ingraham Ball (1890 - 1975)* Burial:
Strawberry Chapel Cemetery
Berkeley County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_james-calvin-beamguard-co-g-18th-sc-inf.jpg]330
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_james-harrelson-co-k-26th-sc-inf.jpg]400
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_james-washington-clark-co-h-1st-regt-sc-vol-inf.jpg]350
James Washington Clark Co H 1st Regt SC Vol Inf. Birth:Sep. 29, 1838
Death:Jul. 21, 1913

Served in Co.H., 1st Regiment SC Volunteers, McCreary's Infantry. Enlisted 1861 in Camden, SC. He was a POW at the end of the war and discharged at Appomattox, Virginia.

Burial:
Cycadia Cemetery
Tarpon Springs
Pinellas County
Florida, USA
Plot: Block J., Lot 68, Space 1
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_john-andrew-devlin-co-d-7th-sc-inf.jpg]350
John Andrew Devlin Co D 7th SC Inf. Birth:Jun. 27, 1840
Smithville
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Sep. 24, 1901
Due West
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA

CSA, Company D, 7th South Carolina Infantry.

Family links:
Parents:
James J. Devlin (1802 - 1883)
Mary Ann Paul Devlin (1813 - 1888)

Spouses:
Martha Lola Galloway Devlin (1858 - 1915)*
Agnes Isabella Wardlaw Devlin (1845 - 1880)*

Children:
Della Devlin (1876 - 1880)*
Ola Devlin Beck (1877 - 1946)*
Lonie Louise Devlin (1877 - 1880)* Burial:
Due West ARP Church Cemetery
Due West
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_john-garvin-greer-co-f-16th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]350
John Garvin Greer Co F 16th Regt. SC Inf. Birth:Apr. 22, 1846
Death:Jul. 14, 1936

Source: The Journal and Carolina Spartan
Date: 15 July 1936:

AGED VETERAN CLOSES GREER
Former Police Chief of Greenville Dies

Greer, July 15 -- John Garvin Greer, 90, Confederate veteran and prominent citizen of this section died Tuesday afternoon at his home in the Pleasant Grove community after an illness of four years.

Funeral services were to be held Wednesday at 5:30 pm at the Pleasant Grove Baptist church, by the Rev. George Hopkins, the Rev. Paul Beacham, the Rev. D.D. Flannigan, the Rev. R. B. Vaughn and the Rev. Frank Snyder. Interment was to follow in the churchyard.

Pallbearers were to be Lee Smith, Arthur Harbin, Lee Henderson, H.W. Childs,Norris Smith and G.D. Wood. The following deacons of the Pleasant Grove church together with the following were to meet at 5:30 pm at the church to serve as honorary pallbearers: C. D. Stradley, J.R. Childress, J.T. Williams, Dr. H.L Brockman, Dr. D.B. Jackson, R.M. Hughes, the Rev. Harvey Taylor, and John W. Brown.

Known to many friends as "Captain Greer" , Mr. Greer enlisted at the age of 16 in the Confederate army, serving in Company F, 16th Regiment commanded by Capt. G.W. Holtzclaw.

Mr. Greer was wounded at Atlanta July 2, 1864 and on Nov. 30, 1864 he was taken as prisoner to Camp Chase, Ohio. He was discharged June 15, 1865 and returned to South Carolina July 4, 1865.

Born near Greer, Mr. Greer when a young man moved to Greenville and resided there 50 years. He served as the chief of the Greenville police department for 16 years.
For eight years he was a member of the firm of Snyder & Greer jewelers in Greer and he served as a special agent for the Southern Railway for 14 years. In 1900 he returned to Pleasant Grove and since then has been a member of of
the South Carolina Legislature from Greenville County for five terms. When 21 years old he became a member of the Baptist church and for a number of years he had been a member of the Pleasant Grove Baptist church.

Mr. Greer was married three times, his first wife being Miss Janie Randall, his second Miss Fannie Foster and his third Miss Corrie Moon McKinney.

He is survived by his third wife and the following children, Mrs. J.M. Monts, Tampa, Fla; G.F. Greer and Mrs. W.A.Roper of Greenville,Mrs. M.Q. Martin of Delta, Colo., John Haskel Greer, Atlanta, Mrs. Ceile (?) Vaughn, A.J. Greer and John H. Greer, all of Greer, one step-daughter, Mrs. Eulis Greer, Taylors, 16 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren.

Family links:
Spouses:
Luvenia Jane Randall Greer (____ - 1891)
Frances Leoline Foster Greer (1861 - 1900)
Corrie Moon Greer (1875 - 1953)

Children:
Eva Greer Roper (1878 - 1950)*
Kate M Greer Woods (1880 - 1965)*
J Haskell Greer (1884 - 1963)*
Harrell H Greer (1899 - 1900)*
John H Greer (1912 - 1986)* Inscription:
Co F 16th SC Reg

Note: Has CSA Marker

Burial:
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church Cemetery
Greer
Greenville County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_john-taylor-stenhouse-co-b-16th-sc-inf.jpg]310
John Taylor Stenhouse, b. 1831--d. 1891, brother of Eben, Greenville, S.C.. Served in Co. "B", 16th S.C. Inf.(C.S.A.). There was another John Taylor Stenhouse, a cousin of theirs, who was the son of Adom and Eliz. Stenhouse, who was mortally wounded at 1st Bull Run. He was in Co. "E", General Wade Hampton's S.C. "Hampton's Legion", C.S.A..
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_john-william-hamel.jpg]310
John William Hamel Birth:Aug. 8, 1820
York County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Sep. 9, 1903
York County
South Carolina, USA

John Hamel is the son of Archibald Hamel (b. 8. Jul 1793 in York, SC, d. 19 Dec 1844 in York, SC) and Rachel _______ (b. 1799 in York, SC; d. after 1880; resided in Gaston County, NC in 1880)

John Hamel married Emily L. Yarborough about 1845. In addition to the three children listed below, John Hamel and Emily L. Yarborough had the following children:

1. Zechariah Taylor Hamel (b. 6 Jun 1846 in York, SC; d. Sep 1850 in York, SC)

2. Elizabeth Manassah Ann Hamel (b.24 Apr 1849 in York, SC, m. Henry Fields Johnston in 1879 in York, SC; d. circa 1890 in Burleson, Texas)

3. Calvin Zuingle Hamel (b. 10 Apr 1856 in York, SC; d. 17 Oct 1866 in York, SC)

Source: The Hamel-Thomasson Family Bible in possession of the Rev. William F. Heustess

John W. Hamel was a Confederate Veteran.

Family links:
Parents:
Archibald Hamel (1793 - 1844)
Rachel Hamel (1799 - 1880)

Spouse:
Emily L Yarborough Hamel (1822 - 1893)

Children:
John William Hamel (1852 - 1917)*
Emma Rachel Hamel Thomason (1854 - 1936)*
Josephus Alexander Hamel (1858 - ____)*
Ida Hamel (1861 - 1927)* Burial:
Ebenezer Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Rock Hill
York County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lieut-alfred-english-doby.jpg]320
Lieut. Alfred English Doby Birth:Oct. 20, 1840
Death:May 6, 1864

Born in Camden South Carolina. Married to Elizabeth M. Kennedy. Member of General Kershaw's staff with rank of lieutenant, CSA. Killed at the Wilderness. War letters are in the Museum of the Confederacy.

Family links:
Spouse:
Elizabeth Kennedy Doby (1842 - 1917)* Burial:
Quaker Cemetery
Camden
Kershaw County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lieut-david-j-harrelson-co-l-10th-sc-inf.jpg]360
Lieut. David J. Harrelson, 1836-1866, Co. L, 10th SC Infantry, from Marion County. Wounded at the Battle of Atlanta, the picture was taken during the war in Meridian, MS.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lieut-john-robert-ellis-co-i-19th-sc-inf.jpg]310
Lieut John Robert Ellis Co I 19th SC Inf. Birth:Mar. 29, 1836
Death:Dec. 18, 1874

CSA, Company I, 19th South Carolina Infantry

(special thanks to John Burgess for relationship link to parents)

Family links:
Parents:
John Lindsay Ellis (1794 - 1879)
Mahala Dodson Ellis (1796 - 1855)

Spouse:
Margaret Frances Barmore Ellis (1837 - 1892)*

Children:
Ann Elizabeth Ellis (1859 - 1861)* Burial:
Lindsay Cemetery
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-col-dr-frederick-sims-lewie-co-c-15th-sc-inf.jpg]320
Lt. Col. (Dr.) Frederick Sims Lewie, 1831-1873, Co. C, 15th SC Infantry, buried St. James Lutheran Church, Summit, Lexington County, SC.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-col-elbert-bland-co-h-7th-sc.jpg]300
Lt. Col. Elbert Bland Birth:Apr. 29, 1823
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Sep. 20, 1863
Fort Oglethorpe
Catoosa County
Georgia, USA

Confederate Officer. Graduated from Medical College of New York. Assistant Surgeon, Palmetto Regiment, Mexican War; Suregon, 1st South Carolina - 1861; Capt., Company H, 7th South Carolina - April 15, 1861; Lt. Col. - May 14, 1862. Wounded at Seven Pines, Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. Killed at Chickamauga.

Willow Brook Cemetery is also known as First Baptist Church Cemetery.

Family links:
Spouse:
Rebecca Griffin Bland (1835 - 1891)*

Children:
Saint Julian Bland (1858 - 1891)* Burial:
Edgefield Village Cemetery
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-ebenezer-stenhouse-columbia-greys-co-c-2nd-sc-inf-under-kershaw.jpg]330
Lt. Ebenezer Stenhouse, "Columbia Greys", Co. C, 2nd SC Vols under Kershaw. The pic is one of him young and mature. If you look closely at the young one, he had long hair swept behind his back. He came from Scotland in the 1840s.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-gen-james-longstreet.jpg]270
Born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, January 8, 1821, the son of a farmer, Longstreet spent his early years in Augusta, Georgia. On the death of his father he went with his mother to Somerville, Alabama. Corps commander James Longstreet made three mistakes that have denied him his deserved place in Southern posterity: He argued with Robert E. Lee at Gettysburg, he was right, and he became a Republican. He entered West Point from Alabama, graduated in 1842, and was wounded at Chapultepec in Mexico. With two brevets and the staff rank of major he resigned his commission on June 1, 1861, and joined the Confederacy. His assignments included: brigadier general, CSA June 17, 1861); commanding brigade (in 1st Corps after July 20), Army of the Potomac July 2 - October 7, 1861);major general, CSA (October 7, 1861); commanding division, Ist Corps, Army of the Potomac (October 14-22, 1861);commanding division (in Potomac District until March 1862), Department of Northern Virginia (October 22, 1861 - July 1862); commanding lst Corps, Army of Northern Virginia July 1862 - February 25, 1863; May - September 9, 1863; April 12 - May 6, 1864; and October 19, 1864-April 9, 1865); lieutenant general, CSA (October 9, 1862); commanding Department of Virginia and North Carolina (February 25-May 1863); commanding his corps, Army of Tennessee (September 19-November 5, 1863); and commanding Department of East Tennessee (November 5, 1863-April 12, 1864).
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-gen-richard-h-anderson.jpg]290
Richard Heron Anderson (October 7, 1821 ? June 26, 1879) was a career U.S. Army officer, fighting with distinction in the Mexican-American War. He also served as a Confederate general during the American Civil War, fighting in the Eastern Theater of the conflict and most notably during the 1864 Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. Anderson was also noted for his humility. Anderson chose to follow his home state and the Confederate cause, and he resigned from the U.S. Army (accepted on March 3, 1861) to enter service with the Confederate Army. Anderson accepted a commission as colonel of the 1st South Carolina Infantry Regiment as of January 28.[3] He was given command of the Charleston harbor area after the capture of Fort Sumter that April.[5] He was promoted to brigadier general on July 19 and transferred to Pensacola, Florida, where he was wounded in the left elbow during the Battle of Santa Rosa Island on October 9.[3]
After recovering, Anderson joined the Confederate Army of the Potomac in February 1862 (which was absorbed into the Army of Northern Virginia later in the spring) as a brigade commander. During the Peninsula Campaign, he distinguished himself at the Battle of Williamsburg in May, during the Battle of Seven Pines, and in the Seven Days Battles in June and July. At Glendale, he took temporary command of Maj. Gen. James Longstreet's division. Because of his excellent performance on the Peninsula, he was promoted to major general on July 14, 1862, and was given command of General Benjamin Huger's former division.[3]*As part of Longstreet's corps, Anderson fought at Second Bull Run. His division engaged the final Union defensive line around Henry House Hill, but the sun was starting to go down and he did not press the attack.
During the Maryland Campaign, General Cadmus Wilcox's division was added to Anderson's command. At the Battle of Antietam in September 1862, he was in overall command at the sunken road, or "Bloody Lane", in the center of the Confederate defense. He was wounded in the thigh and left the battle (his senior brigadier Roger A. Pryor taking over) without which his division began to falter and eventually succumb to Union flank attacks that routed them from their position. At the Battle of Fredericksburg that December, his division was not heavily engaged.
During the Battle of Chancellorsville in May 1863, while operating away from Longstreet's command (because Longstreet was on detached duty near Suffolk, Virginia, at the time), Anderson pressed the Union left while Lt. Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson attacked the right. Anderson and Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws left the main battle line on May 3, and struck east to check the advance of Union Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick's VI Corps that would have led into Gen. Robert E. Lee's rear. Following the death of Stonewall Jackson on May 10, Lee reorganized his army from two into three corps. Anderson was admired enough by Lee to be considered for corps command, but instead his division was assigned to the new Third Corps, commanded by now Lt. Gen A.P. Hill, who outranked Anderson and was one of the senior-most generals in the army. After reorganizing, Anderson retained most of his existing command except for Brig. Gen Lewis Armistead's brigade, which was reassigned to George Pickett's division.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-gen-stephen-d-lee.jpg]280
Stephen Dill Lee graduated 17th out of 46 from the United States Military Academy in 1854. He briefly served with the United States Army during the Seminole Wars, as well as in several outposts in the West, before resigning his commission with the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861.

He first entered the Confederate army as an aide-de-camp and captain for General P. G. T. Beauregard. When Beauregard began organizing companies of artillery Lee was given command of one, and promoted to major in the Confederate army. He commanded a battery of guns under General Joseph E. Johnston, served as chief of artillery for General Lafayette McLaws and later for General John Magruder. He served with distinction through the battles of Seven Pines, Savage?s Station, the Seven Days, and Malvern Hill. Lee then transferred to command a battalion of artillery under General James Longstreet. He fought in the Second Battle of Bull Run as well as Antietam. At Antietam his guns played an important role during the fight for Dunker Church. On November 6, 1862, Lee was promoted to brigadier general and assigned to command the artillery at Vicksburg under General John C. Pemberton. Lee performed well at the battle of Champion Hill and throughout the Vicksburg Campaign. When Vicksburg fell, Lee was captured with many of its defenders. While awaiting parole, Lee was promoted to major general on August 3, 1862 and was placed in command of cavalry within the Department of Mississippi and West Tennessee. Once released in an exchange Lee?s command extended to Alabama and East Louisiana. Lee?s men scored a victory at the battle of Brice?s Crossroads, but were defeated at the battle of Tupelo.

On June 23, 1864, Lee was appointed a lieutenant general, making him the youngest man to reach the rank in the Confederate Army. He took command of General John B. Hood?s former corps within the Army of Tennessee. He commanded this corps through the Atlanta Campaign, including the battles of Jonesborough, Franklin, and Nashville. After the Atlanta Campaign much of his corps was left in ruins. At the end of the war Lee joined General Joseph E. Johnston for the Carolina Campaign and in April he and Johnston surrendered. After the war, Lee served as governor of Mississippi, as well as the first president of Mississippi State College.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-gen-wade-hampton-iii.jpg]290
Wade Hampton III (March 28, 1818 - April 11, 1902) was a Confederate cavalry leader during the American Civil War and afterwards a politician from South Carolina, representing it as governor and U.S. Senator.Although his views were conservative concerning the issues of secession and slavery, and he had opposed the division of the Union as a legislator, at the start of the Civil War, Hampton was loyal to his home state. He resigned from the Senate and enlisted as a private in the South Carolina Militia; however, the governor of South Carolina insisted that Hampton accept a colonel's commission, even though he had no military experience at all. Hampton organized and partially financed the unit known as "Hampton's Legion", which consisted of six companies of infantry, four companies of cavalry, and one battery of artillery. He personally financed all of the weapons for the Legion.

Despite his lack of military experience and his relatively advanced age of 42, Hampton was a natural cavalryman?brave, audacious, and a superb horseman. He merely lacked some of the flamboyance of his contemporaries, such as his eventual commander, J.E.B. Stuart, age 30. He was one of only two officers to achieve the rank of lieutenant general in the cavalry service of the Confederacy, the other being the legendary guerrilla and partisan fighter, Nathan Bedford Forrest.

Hampton first saw combat in July, 1861, at the First Battle of Bull Run, where he deployed his Legion at a decisive moment, giving the brigade of Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson time to reach the field. Hampton was wounded for the first of five times during the war when he led a charge against a federal artillery position, and a bullet creased his forehead.

Hampton was promoted to brigadier general on May 23, 1862, while commanding a brigade in Stonewall Jackson's division in the Army of Northern Virginia. In the Peninsula Campaign, at the Battle of Seven Pines on May 31, 1862, he was severely wounded in the foot, but remained on his horse while it was being treated, still under fire. Hampton returned to duty in time to lead a brigade at the end of the Seven Days Battles, although the brigade was not significantly engaged.

After the Peninsula Campaign, General Robert E. Lee reorganized his cavalry forces as a division under the command of J.E.B. Stuart, who selected Hampton as his senior subordinate, to command one of two cavalry brigades. During the winter of 1862, around the Battle of Fredericksburg, Hampton led a series of cavalry raids behind enemy lines and captured numerous prisoners and supplies without suffering any casualties, earning a commendation from General Lee. During the Battle of Chancellorsville, Hampton's brigade was stationed south of the James River, so saw no action.

In the Gettysburg Campaign, Hampton was slightly wounded in the Battle of Brandy Station, the war's largest cavalry battle. His brigade then participated in Stuart's wild adventure to the northeast, swinging around the Union army and losing contact with Lee. Stuart and Hampton reached the vicinity of Gettysburg late on July 2, 1863. While just outside of town, Hampton was confronted by a Union cavalryman pointing a rifle at him from 200 yards. Hampton charged the trooper before he could fire his rifle, but another trooper blindsided Hampton with a saber cut to the back of his head. On July 3, Hampton led the cavalry attack to the east of Gettysburg, attempting to disrupt the Union rear areas, but colliding with Union cavalry. He received two more saber cuts to the front of his head, but continued fighting until he was wounded again with a piece of shrapnel to the hip. He was carried back to Virginia in the same ambulance as General John Bell Hood.

On August 3, 1863, Hampton was promoted to major general and received command of a cavalry division. His wounds from Gettysburg were slow in healing, so he did not actually return to duty until November. During the Overland Campaign of 1864, Stuart was killed at the Battle of Yellow Tavern and Hampton was given command of the Cavalry Corps on August 11, 1864. He distinguished himself in his new role at the bloody Battle of Trevilian Station, defeating Philip Sheridan's cavalry, and in fact, lost no cavalry battles for the remainder of the war. In September, Hampton conducted what became known as the "Beefsteak Raid", where his troopers captured over 2400 head of cattle and over 300 prisoners behind enemy lines.

While Lee's army was bottled up in the Siege of Petersburg, in January, 1865, Hampton returned to South Carolina to recruit additional soldiers. He was promoted to lieutenant general on February 14, 1865, and surrendered to the Union along with Joseph E. Johnston's army in North Carolina. Hampton was reluctant to surrender. His home in South Carolina had been burned, much of his fortune had been depleted supplying his soldiers, and his many slaves had been freed. Understandably bitter, Hampton was one of the original proponents, alongside General Jubal A. Early, of the Lost Cause movement, attempting to explain away the Confederacy's loss of the war. Hampton was especially angry upon the arrival of black Federal troops to occupy his home state.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-john-warren-white-co-k-palmetto-sharpshooters-sc-inf.jpg]340
Lt. John Warren White of the "Spartan Rifles", Co. "K" Palmetto SharpShooters, SC Vols. John Warren White, resigned after being wounded severly at Seven Pines. Rejoined in '64 as a Private only to be shot through neck in effort to retake Ft. Harrison at Petersburg, died a month later. William White, died of Dyptheria at Chizumbarro Hos in 1862, buried in Hollywood Cemetary.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-thomas-jacob-duckett-jr-co-i-3rd-regt-sc-inf.jpg]350
Lt. Thomas Jacob Duckett, Jr Co I 3rd Regt. SC Inf. Birth:Jan. 4, 1842
Death:May 27, 1919


Family links:
Parents:
Thomas Jacob Duckett (1796 - 1870)
Marrcissa Dillard Duckett (1799 - 1881)

Spouses:
Clarissa Barksdale Duckett (1846 - 1882)*
Edna A. Workman Duckett (1844 - 1928)* Inscription:
Lt. Co I 3rd Regt. SC Inf. C.S.A. A gallant soldier

Burial:
Clinton Cemetery
Clinton
Laurens County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_lt-william-lancaster-grubbs-co-d-2nd-sc-rifles.jpg]320
Lt. William Lancaster Grubbs Co D 2nd SC Rifles Birth:Sep. 27, 1836
Anderson County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Jun. 7, 1929
Kent County
Texas, USA

son of John Mitchell Grubbs - Nancy Ann Cox

When William Grubbs was 19 years of age, he married Permelia Jane Fant on 20 December 1855 in South Carolina. In 1861, William left his wife and family to serve as an officer in the South Carolina Rifles. During the service, William was presented a saber for outstanding bravery and in 1865, he witnessed the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Courthouse.

In 1870, William with his wife and children left South Carolina for Texas. On part of the journey they traveled by steamboat down the Mississippi River and then overland to first settle in Marion and Cass Counties.

1880 Dallas County, Texas census

For a while, they lived at Rusk County before arriving at Young County in 1887.

On 24 August 1889, William Grubbs purchased land on Briar Creek aka Pleasant Creek in the Indian Mound Community. That land today is known as the Hays land.

Twelve children were born to William Grubbs and Permelia Fant:
1. Nancey Leona Grubbs, wife of John B. Harrison;
2. John James Grubbs, husband of Aggie Watson;
3. William Fant, husband of Sarah Ellen James;
4. Margaret Elizabeth Grubbs, wife of J.C. Bullock;
5. Sarah Matilda Grubbs, wife of George James;
6. Mary Janes Grubbs, wife of David Myers;
7. Charles Grubbs, husband of Martha Elkins;
8. Frances Medora Grubbs, wife of William C. McCombs;
9. George W. Grubbs, husband of Audrey Fuqua;
10. Lucy Jane Grubbs, wife of William Fisher;
11. Etta Lee Grubbs, wife of R.W. Easterling;
12. Richard Grubbs.

1st Lieut, Company D, 2nd South Carolina Rifles

Thankful for the influence of my great-great-grandfather.


Family links:
Parents:
John Mitchell Grubbs (1815 - 1893)
Nancy Ann Cox Grubbs (1816 - 1892)

Spouse:
Permelia Jane Fant Grubbs (1833 - 1907)

Children:
James John Grubbs (1858 - 1944)*
William Fant Grubbs (1859 - 1935)*
Margaret Elizabeth Grubbs Bullock (1861 - 1913)*
Sarah Matilda Grubbs James (1863 - 1910)*
Mary Catherine Grubbs Myers (1865 - 1954)*
Frances Medora Grubbs McCombs (1870 - 1971)*
Lucy Jane Grubbs Fisher (1875 - 1968)*
Etta Lee Grubbs Easterling (1877 - 1966)* Burial:
Oak Grove Cemetery
Graham
Young County
Texas, USA
Plot: Section 8, Block 20, Space B
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_major-edward-mortimer-boykin-co-k-7th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]310
Dr Edward Mortimer Mortimer Boykin Birth:May 17, 1820
Camden
Kershaw County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Nov. 10, 1891
Camden
Kershaw County
South Carolina, USA

Son of John and Charlotte Mortimer Boykin.

Edward, who was a physician, was elected on September 21, 1861, as first lieutenant, Mounted Squadron of Rifles, and promoted to captain on September 5, 1862. His company in 1864, became Co. K, 7th Regiment of SC Cavalry.

He was appointed major of the regiment on April 25, 1864 under the constitutional authority vested in the President, but the appointment was not confirmed. He was again appointed major on September 27, 1864 and was confirmed.

Major Boykin was wounded on May 30, 1864 and was sent on medical furlough June 6th. He was paroled at Appomattox Court House on April 1865.

Edward was the author of The Falling Flag. Evacuation of Richmond, Retreat and Surrender at Appomattox that was published in 1874. It is dedicated to:

"The Officers and Men of the 7th South Carolina Cavalry, this short account of an interesting period in their military history, and that of the cause they loved so well, and for which they fought so faithfully, is dedicated, by one who considers having been their comrade the proudest recollection of his life." Family links:
Spouse:
Mary Chestnut Lang Boykin (1820 - 1907)*

Children:
Sallie Wyly Boykin Wilson (1858 - 1930)* Burial:
Quaker Cemetery
Camden
Kershaw County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_major-gen-matthew-c-butler.jpg]440
Major Gen Matthew C Butler Birth:Mar. 8, 1836
Death:Apr. 14, 1909

Civil War Confederate Major General, US Senator. He was born in Greenville, South Carolina. He was the nephew of naval heroes Oliver Hazard and Matthew Calbraith Perry, and former South Carolina Governor and Mexican War hero, Pierce Mason Butler. He attended a local academy then moved to Indian Territory with his father, former congressman William Butler, who was serving as an agent to the Cherokee Nation. On his parents' death, he resided in Edgefield, South Carolina, with another uncle, United States Senator Andrew Pickens Butler. He attended South Carolina College, was admitted to the bar, and in 1857 married Maria Pickens, the daughter of South Carolina Governor Francis Pickens. In 1861 he resigned a seat in the state legislature to become Captain of a local cavalry unit. By First Bull Run, he was commanding a mounted unit in Wade Hampton's Hampton Legion. Afterward he was promoted to Major and in August 1862 he was made Colonel of the 2nd South Carolina Cavalry. He led the regiment with skill and daring in the Antietam and Fredericksburg campaigns. At Brandy Station, he guarded the rear of Stuart's cavalry division against a Union flanking movement. It was during this fight that the young Colonel lost his right foot to an artillery shell. Returning to the field on crutches early the next year, he was appointed a Brigadier General and was conspicuous in many of the cavalry battles of 1864, especially Haw's Shop and Trevilian Station. Later promoted to Major General, at war's end he was fighting but fruitlessly against the invaders of his native state. After the war, he returned to law and politics. He worked to integrate blacks into South Carolina politics. After failing in a bid to become Lieutenant Governor, he joined the Democratic party and when his old commander, Wade Hampton, became Governor in 1876, he was named a United States Senator. He served 3 terms in Washington, being defeated in 1892 by Ben Tillman. He then practiced law in Washington until the Spanish-American War, serving as a Major General of Volunteers. He later served on the commission that oversaw the Spanish evacuation of Cuba. Later he was an officer in a Mexican mining company and vice president of the Southern Historical Association. He later would die in Washington DC. Family links:
Parents:
William Butler (1790 - 1851)
Jane Tweedy Perry Butler (1799 - 1875)

Spouses:
Maria Pickens Butler (1833 - 1900)*
Nannie DeSaussure Bostick Butler (1859 - 1942)*

Children:
Francis Wilkinson Pickens Butler (1858 - 1924)*
William Wallace Butler (1860 - 1891)*
Elsie Butler (1869 - 1891)* Burial:
Edgefield Village Cemetery
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_manuel-simeon-corley.jpg]290
Manuel Simeon Corley Birth:1823
Death:1902

US Congressman. Elected to represent South Carolina's 3rd District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1867 to 1869.

Family links:
Spouse:
Martha A. Richardson Corley (1828 - 1908)* Burial:
Saint Stephens Lutheran Church Cemetery
Lexington
Lexington County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-alex-bourne-co-a-26th-sc-inf.jpg]390
Pvt. Alex Bourne 1844-1884 Co A, 26th SC Infantry, CSA of Horry County, SC. He was one of many from Horry in the 26th SC. He was sick for a long time during the war but did recover to finish his duty. Ancestor of Jamie Graham of Conway, SC & others. He was very young when this picture was taken during the WBTS. Buried at Parker Cemetery in Horry.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-amaziah-whitman-gentry-sc-inf.jpg]340
Pvt. Amaziah Whitman Gentry SC Inf Birth:Sep. 26, 1832
Starr
Anderson County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Dec. 5, 1924
Starr
Anderson County
South Carolina, USA

Son of Moody Gentry and Elizabeth Arnold, he married Lucy Carolyn/Caroline Campbell about February 1860 in Starr, Anderson County, South Carolina.

Confederate Soldier

Civil War Service Records.
Amaziah Gentry appears on Muster Roll of Conscripts in Camp of Instructions, Columbia, S.C. to November 16, 1862.
Amaziah enlisted July 20, 1862 in Anderson Co. S.C.
He would have been 30 years of age at time of enlistment.
Muster Roll shows Amaziah absent in the Hospital
A.W. Gentry, South Carolina Batt'n. Infantry (Walker's Battalion.)
Company: F
Soldier's Rank In: Private
Film Number: M381 roll 12
Civil War Service Records

Name: A.W. Gentry
Unit: Conscripts: South Carolina Company of Instructions, Columbia, S.C
Rank-Induction: Private
Rank-Discharge: Private
Allegiance: Confederate
Source Citation: Box: 381; Extraction: 12 Record: 1683

Civil War Service Records
Name: A.W. Gentry
Company: F
Unit: Conscripts: South Carolina Battalion Infantry
Rank-Induction: Private
Rank-Discharge: Private
Allegiance: Confederate
Source Citation: Box: 381; Extraction: 12 Record: 1683 Family links:
Parents:
Moody Gentry (1797 - 1885)

Spouse:
Lucy Caroline/Carolyn Campbell Gentry (1841 - 1932)

Children:
William Harper Gentry (1870 - 1923)* Burial:
Starr Baptist Church Cemetery
Starr
Anderson County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-david-blanton.jpg]310
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-edward-richard-simms-co-k-2nd-sc-inf.jpg]290
My Great-great Grandfather Private Edward Richard. Simms born March 14, 1837, in Sumter County, SC. On April 8, 1861, he enlisted, Sumter Volunteers (Company D, 2nd South Carolina Infantry) transferred to Company K, South Carolina Infantry, August 26, 1861, mustered in with Brooks Artillery, upon organization January 28, 1862, wounded September 17, 1862, at Sharpsburg, Maryland, wounded Gettysburg, PA, re-enlisted at Beams Station, TN, December 28, 1863, promoted Corporal September 1, 1864, furlough 45 days January, February 1865, according to his pension that was filed with the state of South Carolina, he was wounded 4 times, was deaf in one ear, and had back injuries and was surrendered at Appomattox. He walks all the way back to South Carolina. On January 25, 1866, he married Rebecca Lynes of South Carolina. They had four children 3 boys and one girl. He remains a farmer and dies on March 17, 1922 of a cerebral hemorrhage, and is buried at the Groomesville Baptist Cemetery in Moncks Corner, South Carolina.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-elijah-r-amick-co-c-15th-sc-inf.jpg]350
Pvt. Elijah R. Amick, Co. C, 15th SC Infantry, ca.1844 to Sept. 6, 1863. Wounded at Gettysburg-captured-died of wounds at US Camp Letterman Hospital, Gettsburg, buried there. Removed to Magnolia Cemetery Charleston SC, 1870. Buried on row 1, grave 10 as Lt. Emick (the old German family name).
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-elisha-capers-bunch.jpg]300
Pvt. Elisha Capers Bunch Birth:Feb. 13, 1828
Death:Sep. 19, 1893 Family links:
Parents:
John Elisha Bunch (1783 - 1839)
Isabella Bunch (1796 - 1852)

Spouse:
Harriet Elizabeth Crawford Bunch (1856 - 1912)

Children:
Eliza A. Coley (1873 - 1914)*
Catherine O. Isabella Bunch Jernigan (1876 - 1962)*
Caroline Edith Bunch Blitch Robertson (1877 - 1914)*
Elisha Calvin Bunch (1878 - 1935)*
Hattie Louise Bunch Brittingham (1883 - 1963)*
James Rennie Bunch (1884 - 1949)*
Arthur Jehu Bunch (1886 - 1960)*
Irene Estelle Bunch Wallace (1891 - 1974)*
Jesse M. Bunch (1893 - 1968)*
Benjamin Cornelius Bunch (1899 - 1960)* Burial:
Rehobeth United Methodist Church Cemetery
Macbeth
Berkeley County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-elisha-tyler-co-b-manigaults-batt-sc-artillery.jpg]360
Pvt. Elisha Tyler of Horry County, SC. He served in Co B, Manigault's Battalion SC Artillery, CSA. He has the red trim on his uniform that was hand tinted during the WBTS. He is the ancestor of Phyllis Tyler Richardson, Greg Tyler & Steven Tyler (and others) of the Aynor, SC area. Pvt. Tyler is buried at Bayboro Baptist Church in Horry, SC. There is a small bridge in that area named after him also.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-jacob-cannon-co-g-10th-sc-inf.jpg]280
Birth:1839
Horry County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Feb. 7, 1934
Horry County
South Carolina, USA

Enlisted January 7, 1862 (Col. Manigault) & served in Co G, 10th SC Infantry, CSA (Horry Rough & Ready Infantry).


Burial:
Stevens Cemetery
Horry County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-jacob-madison-mckay-co-e-8th-sc-inf.jpg]260
Pvt. Jacob Madison McKay born in Timmonsville,S.C. on 18 April 1837 and died 1918. He is Buried in McKay Cemetery in Timmonsville, Florence County,S.C., His grave is on findagrave.com. He fought in the 8th S.C. Infantry Co. E. He was wounded 20 Sept. 1863 in the Battle at Chickamauga,Ga.. He was captured 8 May 1864 in Spotsylvania Va. and sent to Belle Plains, Va., then was received in Fort Delware prison on 20 May 1864. He was released 10 June 1865 and returned to Timmonsville, S.C. where he continued his life with his family as a farmer.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-james-hogan-doyle-co-g-7th-sc-cav.jpg]240
Pvt James Hogan Doyle Co G 7th SC Cav Birth:1846
South Carolina, USA
Death:1933
Texas, USA

He was wounded in 1864 at the battle of Cold Harbor. Twin brother of William Earl Doyle,both served in Company G, 7th South Carolina Cavalry, Gary?s Brigade .

Burial:
Granbury Cemetery
Granbury
Hood County
Texas, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-john-alex-sarter-co-b-18th-sc-inf.jpg]310
Private John Alex Sarter, Co. B, 18th SC Infantry, 1835-1933. He has a VA upright Confederate stone and is buried in the Wyatt Chapel Baptist Church Cemetery in Union County, SC.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-john-sumter-cole-co-f-7th-sc-cav.jpg]270
Pvt John Sumter Cole Co F 7th SC Cav Birth:Jun. 26, 1825
Sumter County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Oct. 7, 1900
Clarendon County
South Carolina, USA

"John was born on June 26, 1825 in Sumter County, SC to John and Jennete B. Hickson Cole. John married his first wife, Ann Emaline Keels, about 1851 they had five children: Joseph b. 1850, Isabella b. 1852, Jacob b. 1853, Julia b. 1855 and Martha b. 1858. John's wife Ann died on October 24, 1862, four months later he enlisted.

John enlisted in Company A, Tucker's Cavalry Squadron at Georgetown, SC on March 7, 1863. He was assigned to Company B on April 8, 1863. On that roster when it became Company F, 7th SC Cavalry. Present March 1863 - February 12, 1864. Detailed to Commissary Depot in Georgetown February 12th - 29th, 1864; present mounted March - October 1864, dismounted since October 7,1864.

On November 25, 1864, Captain W. L. Wallace wrote a letter to Col. H. Taylor where he mentions that Private J. S. Cole and Sgt. J. D. Sessions horses were killed by the enemy in action on the Charles City Road on October 7, 1864. Captain Wallace fixed appraisement and valued John's horse at $1,800.00.

John was wounded at Appomattox Station on April 8, 1865 in his right hand by a minie ball. He was at Flying (Field) Hospital, 24th Army Corps April 11th - 13, 1865; paroled at Appomattox while still a patient in the hospital. Transferred to CSA General Hospital in Farmville on April 13, 1865, again paroled and released on April 16, 1865.

In 1866, John married his second wife, Eliza Ann Wilson Dye widow of John Dye. They had five children together: Robert b. 1867, Charles b. 1869, James b. 1871, Jeanette b. 1873 and Claude b. 1876.

John died on October 7, 1900, the same month and day that his horse was killed thirty-six years earlier during the war. He is buried in Manning Cemetery, Clarendon County, SC." - https://sites.google.com/site/companyf7thregimentsccavalry/home/privates-a---c/cole-john-s


Family links:
Parents:
John Cole (1797 - 1866)
Jennet B. Hickson Cole (1804 - 1877)

Spouses:
Ann Emaline Keels Cole (1831 - 1862)
Eliza Anne Wilson Cole (1832 - 1906)

Children:
Joseph F. Cole (1850 - 1938)*
Claude O. Cole (1875 - 1952)* Burial:
Manning Cemetery
Manning
Clarendon County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-joseph-wesley-amick-co-i-15th-inf.jpg]270
Pvt. Joseph Wesley Amick, Co. I, 15th SC Infantry, born ca.1843, kiled in action Battle Of Fox's Gap, Maryland Sept. 14, 1862 (South Mountain). Bodies put in Wise's well and lated moved to Rose Hill/Washington Cemetery (Confederate Section), Hagerstown, Maryland.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-larkin-gambrell-clardy-co-d-18th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]250
Pvt Larkin Gambrell Clardy Co D 18th Regt SC Inf. Birth:Sep. 16, 1841
South Carolina, USA
Death:Jul. 1, 1864

CSA
South Carolina
18th Reg't,SC Infantry

Born to Joab Mauldin Clardy and wife Mary Pollie Gambrell.

Family links:
Parents:
Joab Mauldin Clardy (1814 - 1892)
Mary Gambrell Clardy (1821 - 1897)

Burial:
Hollywood Cemetery
Richmond
Richmond City
Virginia, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-samuel-t-jenrette-co-b-manigults-batt-sc-artillery.jpg]240
Pvt. Samuel T. Jenrette 1824-1911 served in the 10 SC Inf., CSA. He was from Horry, SC & is buried at Rehobeth UMC in Horry (Galivants Ferry section). His photo appears on his tombstone.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-thaddeus-patrick-raines-co-a-14th-sc-inf.jpg]320
Pvt. Thaddeus Patrick Raines, Co.A, 14th SC Infantry.
His son was a member of the Wade Hampton SCV Camp in Columbia.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-thomas-spencer-cartee-co-d-18th-sc-inf.jpg]250
Pvt. Thomas Spencer Cartee Co D 18th SC Inf Birth:Jun. 13, 1832
Boaz
Marshall County
Alabama, USA
Death:Apr. 20, 1907
Boaz
Marshall County
Alabama, USA

Husabnd of (1) Susan Unknown Mrs.Cartee, (2) Sarah J . Dyar.

PVT Confederate States Army

Family links:
Spouse:
Sarah J Dyar Cartee (1845 - 1900)* Burial:
Friendship Cemetery
Boaz
Marshall County
Alabama, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_pvt-william-meadow-burch-4th-sc-vol-cav.jpg]250
Pvt. William Meadow Burch Birth:Apr. 23, 1840
Death:Dec. 22, 1921

William Meadow Burch was born in Mt Croghan, SC on 23 Apr 1840, the son Joseph Thomas Burch and Susannah Jackson Burch. In 1860, he married Henrietta Frances Jackson, the daughter of Stephen Jackson, a signer of the SC Ordinance of Secession. Henrietta was his second cousin once removed. The couple had ten children: William Franklin, Lula Jackson, Henry Andrew, Benjamin Stephen, Joseph Blakeney, Mary Roxanna, Christopher Columbus, Jessie Susanna, Henrietta Jeannette and Rufus Edwin.

William Meadow Burch, his five brothers and two nephews all served as cavalrymen during the Civil War. He enlisted in Co A, 4th Squadron, 12th Battalion,SC Volunteer Cavalry on 22 Apr 1862, when his first child was seven months old. This unit later became part of the 4th SC Volunteer Cavalry. He served honorably until the end of the war and was discharged in 1865 at Greensboro, NC. Among his Confederate duties was being detached from his unit to serve as a courier at district headquarters. In late October 1863, he was given a 10-day furlough. His second child was born nine months later.

Before the war, the Burch family possessed considerable property and wealth. This changed with the war. In his application for a Confederate pension in 1919, William stated that the value of his property did not exceed $500. His death certificate lists his occupation as "farmer."

William Meadow Burch died on 22 Dec 1921 in Mt Croghan, SC at the age of 81 years 8 months. His death certificate lists the cause of death as "pneumonia and old age." He is buried at Elizabeth Baptist Church Cemetery in Mt Croghan.

Family links:
Parents:
Joseph Thomas Burch (1798 - 1868)
Susannah Jackson Burch (1803 - 1860)

Spouse:
Henrietta Frances Jackson Burch (1843 - 1913)*

Children:
William Franklin Burch (1861 - 1927)*
Lula Burch Baker (1864 - 1928)*
Henry Andrew Burch (1867 - 1942)*
Benjamin Stephen Burch (1869 - 1951)*
Joseph Blakeney Burch (1872 - 1901)*
Christopher C. Burch (1877 - 1954)*
Henrietta Jeannette Burch Burch (1882 - 1967)* Burial:
Elizabeth Baptist Church Cemetery
Mount Croghan
Chesterfield County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_redmond-foster-wyatt-co-g-22nd-sc-inf.jpg]220
Redmond Foster Wyatt. Company G, 22nd South Carolina Vol. Infantry. Killed in the explosion, Battle of The Crater Petersburg, VA. July 30, 1864.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_rev-andrew-jackson-eddins-4th-sc-cav.jpg]240
Rev Andrew Jackson "Jack" Eddins 4th SC Cav Birth:Feb. 3, 1826
Death:Nov. 20, 1912


Mr. and Mrs. Eddins were charter member of Pine Grove Baptist Church when it was organized in 1870. Mr. Eddins preached there for a number of years and both are buried in this cemetery. They were deeply consecrated Christians and raised a fine family of eleven children, all living to maturity. Mr. Eddins served in the War Between the States for four years in Craig's Calvary 4th S.C. Regiment. He was a substantial planter.

This bio information was taken from Eddins and Thurman family history compiled by Minnie Lee Sanders Rivers.


Family links:
Parents:
Nehemiah Eddins (1795 - 1885)
Obedience Eddins (____ - 1878)

Spouse:
Dorothy Thurman Eddins (1832 - 1926)

Children:
Albert Eddins (1855 - 1920)*
Lucinda Eddins Smith Harris (1856 - 1925)*
Isabelle Eddins Rivers (1859 - 1909)*
Jacquelina Eddins Swinnie (1860 - 1918)*
Emma Hudson Eddins White (1862 - 1918)*
Rose Anna Eddins Parker (1866 - ____)*
Lucy Theresa Eddins Teal (1868 - 1927)*
William Jackson Eddins (1869 - 1908)*
Sarah Elizabeth Eddins (1871 - 1932)*
Thomas Ray Eddins (1873 - 1928)*
Addeline Lora Eddins Davis (1876 - 1947)* Inscription:
His Wife

Note: His Wife was Dorothy Thurman Eddins

Burial:
Pine Grove Baptist Church Cemetery
Chesterfield County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_rev-george-washington-bussey.jpg]230
Rev George Washington Bussey Birth:1845
Death:1927

Confederate States Army.

Son of Joseph M. Bussey and Elizabeth Jane Vance.


Family links:
Parents:
Joseph Bussey (1817 - 1893)
Elizabeth Jane Vance Bussey (1825 - 1863)

Spouses:
Hattie Laura Morgan Bussey (1842 - 1871)
Julia Emma Whitmire Bussey (1856 - 1929)* Inscription:
Active Pastor for 50 years, Pastor of Red Oak Grove Church most of that time.
Private in Confederate War, Chaplain in 1st S.C. Infantry, Spanish American War. Vigorous personality, devout Christian, noble character, devoted husband and father, faithful servant of God.


Burial:
Red Oak Grove Baptist Church Cemetery
Edgefield
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_rev-william-moffatt-grier-6th-regt-sc-inf.jpg]210
Rev William Moffatt Grier 6th Regt. SC Inf. Birth:Feb. 11, 1843
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Sep. 3, 1899
Due West
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA

CSA, 6th South Carolina

(special thanks to GMG for the following info) - Rev. William Moffat Grier D.D., born 11 February 1843 in Clover, Abbeville County, South Carolina, was the second son of Robert C. and Barbara B. Grier. He married Miss Nannie M. McMorries of Newberry, South Carolina. He graduated from Erskine College in the class of 1860.

As a veteran of the Civil War serving in the CSA Sixth Regiment of South Carolina, William Grier lost a leg at the Battle of Williamsburg, on 05 May 1862.

After the war, William Grier was licensed as an Associate Reformed Presbyterian minister at Cedar Springs A.R.P. in 1866 and settled as pastor at Oak Hill, Wilcox County, Alabama. In September, 1871, he was called to succeed his father as President of Erskine College. Serving in that post until his death on 03 August 1899 in Due West, Abbeville County, South Carolina.

Family links:
Children:
Jennie Grier Moffatt (1865 - 1945)*
Robert Livingston Grier (1869 - 1939)* Burial:
Due West ARP Church Cemetery
Due West
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_robert-gill-mills-dunovant.jpg]220
Robert Gill Mills Dunovant Birth:May 18, 1821
Chester County
South Carolina, USA
Death:May 12, 1898
Edgefield
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA


Family links:
Parents:
John Dunovant (1787 - 1855)
Margaret Dunovant (1797 - 1843)

Spouses:
Ellen Brooks Dunovant (1829 - 1870)*
Margaret Agnes Henderson Dunovant (1896 - 1995)*

Children:
Margaret Leslie Dunovant (1851 - 1859)*
John Quay Dunovant (1853 - 1854)*
Mary Carroll Dunovant (1856 - 1857)*
Ellen Butler Dunovant (1857 - 1859)*
Robert Lee Dunovant (1862 - 1940)* Burial:
Edgefield Village Cemetery
Edgefield County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_samuel-dekalb-barron.jpg]210
Birth:Jan. 31, 1847
Death:Oct. 30, 1886

During the Civil War he enlisted in Lafayette's Light Artillery Kanapaux's Company on April 3, 1864 at Coosawhatcie South Carolina, with proper consent for a minor. He was captured Januayr 16, 1865 at Pocatilo South Carolina and arrived at Point Lookout Prison on Febuary 1, 1865. He was released June 23, 1865. He was the son of John Barron and Eliza E. Pressley. He married Lucy Anna Bynum.

Family links:
Children:
Samuel Elmer Barron (1883 - 1960)* Burial:
Ebenezer Presbyterian Church Cemetery
Rock Hill
York County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_samuel-dibble.jpg]220
Samuel Dibble Birth:Sep. 16, 1837
Death:Sep. 16, 1913

US Congressman. Elected to represent South Carolina's 1st and 2nd District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1881 to 1882, and 1883 to 1891. Also served as a Member of the South Carolina State Legislature. (bio by: K)

Family links:
Spouse:
Mary Christiana Louis Dibble (1844 - 1922)*

Children:
Louis Virgil Dibble (1873 - 1917)*
Samuel Dibble (1888 - 1952)* Burial:
Sunnyside Cemetery
Orangeburg
Orangeburg County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_sgt-daniel-h-martin-co-e-26th-sc-inf.jpg]260
Birth:Feb. 18, 1842
Horry County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Dec. 9, 1910
Horry County
South Carolina, USA

Co E, 26th SC Infantry, CSA (1861-1865). Also a POW survivor from Point Lookout, MD. He was released from Pt. Lookout June 29, 1865 & walked barefoot all the way back to Horry County, SC. The Yankee's took all the shoes away from the Confederates & made them walk away from the POW Camp barefoot.

Parents:
Isaac Martin b. 1820
Sarah Jane McCrackin b. 1822

Spouse:
Victoria Jordan b. 1853

Children:
Isaac McM. Martin 1869-1912
Margaret J. Martin 1871-
Willie James D. Martin 1873-1936
Mary "Mollie" F. Martin b. 1875-1952
Catherine Vick Martin 1877-1932
Joseph Franklin Martin 1886-
Archie Martin 1889- Burial:
Brown Swamp United Methodist Cemetery
Conway
Horry County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_sgt-john-mitchell-grubbs-co-a-1st-state-troops.jpg]230
Sgt. John Mitchell Grubbs Co A 1st State Troops Birth:Mar. 1, 1815
Abbeville County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Mar. 17, 1893
Jefferson
Marion County
Texas, USA

Anderson Inteligencer, May 3 1893

Townville - Mr. John M. Grubbs died recently at his home near Jefferson, Texas. He was born and reared in Anderson County and for 30 years or more resided near the Fork, removing thence in 1870 to Texas. In early life he married Miss Nancy Cox, the daughter of the late John Cox, a substantial citizen living on the Abbeville side of Anderson County and sister of Major D. L. Cox, now of Sherman, Texas. Five of his sons served in the Confederate Army, two of them giving their lives to the cause. One died in Va. of wounds and the other was killed in a memorable fight between Jenkins' Brigade and the Federal hosts in Will's Valley near Chattanooga in November of '63. Another, W. T. Grubbs, now auditor of Oconee County, lost an arm in the Battle of Fredricksburg, Dec. 13, 1862, and still another, W. L. Grubbs, now of Texas, distinguished himself as first lieutenant in Co. D, 2nd SC Rifles. In the fall of '63 the exigencies of war drew Mr. Grubbs himself into service and he did his duty in Charleston as 1st sergeant in Capt. T. H. Russell's Company, and later was in active service as 1st Lieutenant in Co. E, Barnett's Battalion of State Troops. He was for a number of years a magistrate and made a capable officer. He was lifelong Baptist. The news of his death will carry sadness into many homes in Anderson and elsewhere. W. A. Dickson.

Family links:
Parents:
Richard Grubbs (1772 - 1819)
Elizabeth Mitchell Shirley (1776 - 1854)

Spouse:
Nancy Ann Cox Grubbs (1816 - 1892)

Children:
William Lancaster Grubbs (1836 - 1929)*
Richard W. Grubbs (1838 - 1862)*
Waddy Thompson Grubbs (1841 - 1923)*
George Washington Grubbs (1848 - 1918)* Burial:
New Prospect Cemetery
Jefferson
Marion County
Texas, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_sgt-joseph-jackson-todd-co-g-10th-sc-inf.jpg]270
Sgt. Joseph Jackson Todd 1816-1901 Co G, 10th SC Infantry, CSA. He is buried at Bethlehem Baptist Church located on hwy 905 in the Shell section of Horry, SC.
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_weary-clyburn-co-e-12th-sc-inf.jpg]310
Weary Clyburn Co E 12th SC Inf. Birth:1841
Lancaster County
South Carolina, USA
Death:Mar. 30, 1930
Union County
North Carolina, USA

Weary (aka "Wary") lists his father as Phillip Blair on a Union County marriage license in December 1867. His bride was Viney Moore, d/o of Edman Horne. They were married Dec. 21, 1867. He would later marry again to Eliza (Liza) Brown per family history. Weary was known for his fiddle playing and his enthusiastic approach to life. Raised with his master's son, Thomas F. (Frank) Clyburn, Weary went to war with Frank, becoming his bodyguard and servant. Frank was a Captain with the 12th SC, Co. E. Weary applied for a pension for his service in the War Between the States on February 1, 1926. He was one of the first persons of color to recieve a Confederate pension in Union County, NC. Per his notice of death in The Monroe Journal, April 1, 1930 (page 1), Weary was buried "wrapped in the Confederate uniform of gray". His grave was marked in the summer of 2008 by the SCV, James Miller Camp 2116.

Note: Grave is found on the original burial grounds of what is now known as Hillcrest City Cemetery.

Burial:
Hillcrest Cemetery
Monroe
Union County
North Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_william-amos-roberts.jpg]260
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_william-ashmead-courtenay.jpg]240
William Ashmead Courtenay Birth:Feb. 4, 1831
Charleston
South Carolina, USA
Death:Mar. 17, 1908
Columbia
South Carolina, USA

Served in the Confederate Army 1861-1865. Mayor of Charleston, S.C., 1880-1887. President of the Chamber of Commerce 1885-1888. In 1887 he was elected a Trustee of the Peabody Education Board.

Family links:
Children:
Julia Courtenay Richardson (1875 - 1960)* Burial:
Magnolia Cemetery
Charleston
Charleston County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_william-earl-doyle-co-g-7th-sc-cav.jpg]270
William Earl Doyle Co G 7th SC Cav Birth:Apr. 26, 1846
Death:Sep. 9, 1934

Doyle, William Earl
Co G 7th South Carolina Cavalry
Confederate States Army
CIVIL WAR

b. 04/26/1846 Oconee Station, Pickens County,
South Carolina
d. 09/09/1934

Texas? can boast of twin brothers who served in the war together. They are J.H. and W.E. Doyle, the former a merchant at Granbury, where he has lived for fifty years, and the latter a practicing attorney of Teague, Tex.

They were born in Pickens District, now Oconee County, S.C., April 26, 1846, and they served the Confederacy as members of Company G, 7th South Carolina Cavalry, Gary's Brigade, taking an active part in the strenuous campaigns of the Army of Northern Virginia down to Appomattox.

J.H. Doyle was wounded once.
W.E. Doyle served in the thirty-seventy and thirty-eighth legislatures of Texas as senator from the twelfth district, and is likely the last Confederate veteran to serve in that capacity.
Family links:
Spouse:
Sallie Lou Doyle (1856 - 1896)* Burial:
Mexia City Cemetery
Mexia
Limestone County
Texas, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_william-huggins-brawley.jpg]250
William Huggins Brawley Birth:May 13, 1841
Death:Nov. 15, 1916

Civil War Veteran US Congressman. Served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War. Elected to represent South Carolina's 1st District in the United States House of Representatives, serving from 1891 to 1894. Also served as a Member of the South Carolina State House of Representatives from 1882 to 1890, and Judge of the United States District Court for the District of South Carolina from 1894 to 1911. During the Civil War (1861-1865), at the Battle of Seven Pines, Virginia, he lost an arm.

Family links:
Spouses:
Marion Emma Porter Brawley (1843 - 1906)*
Mildred Boykin Frost Brawley (1878 - 1951)*

Children:
Harriet Brawley Simonds (1870 - 1937)*
William Porter Brawley (1872 - 1909)*
Burial:
Magnolia Cemetery
Charleston
Charleston County
South Carolina, USA
[img src=http://scscv.com/wp-content/flagallery/confederate-soldiers/thumbs/thumbs_william-m-gist-15th-regt-sc-vol-inf.jpg]280
William M. Gist 15th Regt. SC Vol Inf. Birth:Oct. 3, 1840
Death:Nov. 18, 1863


Family links:
Parents:
William Henry Gist (1807 - 1874)
Mary E. Rice Gist (1813 - 1889)

Note: Killed in Knoxville Tenn.in command of 15th Reg. S.C.V.

Burial:
Gist Cemetery
Cross Keys
Union County
South Carolina, USA

 

If you have Images of your Confederate Ancestor

And would like to have them Honored …

Submit Here

Enter your email address to subscribe to the South Carolina Division blog and receive notifications of all the new posts by email.