Our Confederate Heroes – Edward Richard Simms

Private Edward Richard Simms

Private Edward Richard. Simms born March 14, 1837, in Sumter County, SC. On April 8, 1861, he enlisted, Sumter Volunteers (Company D, 2nd South Carolina Infantry)  He was with that company during the firing on Fort Sumter, April 12- 14, 1861, stationed on Morris Island. He transferred to Company K, South Carolina Infantry, August 26, 1861, and reenlisted on January 28, 1862, when sixty one members of the Brooks Guard voted to become light Artillery into Capt. A.B. Rhett’s Co (became Capt. Ficklings Co. Brooks Light Artillery)

He was wounded September 17, 1862, at Sharpsburg, Maryland, wounded Gettysburg, PA, re-enlisted at Beams Station, TN, December 28, 1863, promoted Corporal September 1, 1864, furlough 45 days January, February 1865, according to his pension that was filed with the state of South Carolina, he was wounded 4 times, was deaf in one ear, and had back injuries and was surrendered at Appomattox. He walked all the way back to South Carolina.

Muster Roll listings from:
Capt. J.S. Richardson’s Company, 2 (Palmetto) Regiment, SC Volunteers, Co D
Capt. J.S. Richardson’s Company, 2 (Palmetto) Regiment, SC Volunteers, Co K
Capt. A.B. Rhett’s Co., 1st. Reg Light Artillery (Col. W.B. FitzGerald): Jan. 1862
Capt. A.B. Rhett’s Co., 1st., Light Artillery, SC Volunteers: Feb. – May 1862
Capt. A.B. Rhett’s Co., Lee’s Reserve Battalion, Light Artillery: Jul. – Oct. 1862
Capt. A.B. Rhett’s Co., Alexander’s Light Artillery Battalion: Jan. – Apr. 1863
Capt. W.W. Fickling’s Co. (F), Alexander’s Battalion, Light Artillery: May – Dec. 1863
Capt. W.W. Fickling’s Co. (F), Huger’s Battalion, Light Artillery: Mar. 1864 – Jan. 1865 (Corp.)

On January 25, 1866, he married Rebecca Lynes of South Carolina. They had four children, 3 boys and one girl. He remains a farmer and dies on March 17, 1922 of a cerebral hemorrhage, and is buried at the Groomesville Baptist Cemetery in Moncks Corner, South Carolina.

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From the News and Courier, Charleston, SC, Tuesday, March 22, 1921:

Southern Veteran Dies at Strawberry

Mr. Edward Sims, of Strawberry, responded to the call of “taps” Friday after a brief illness. Mr. Sims served in the Civil War under Capt. John S Richardson in the Second South Carolina infantry, Sumter Volunteers.
Capt. Richardson was wounded at the first battle of Bull Run. After that Mr. Sims was transferred to Capt. Burnett Rhett also of the Second South Carolina Infantry, where he served for more than one year, after which he was transferred to Capt. Rhett’s battery, Brooks artillery in which he served until the end of the Civil War.
His colonels were: Col. J. B Kershaw, from Columbia: Col. Stephen D Lee of South Carolina: Col. Alexander of Maryland and Col. Frank Huger of Tennessee. His generals were: Gen. G. T. Beauregard, Gen. A. L. Johnson, the latter being severely wounded at the battle of Seven Pines. Then Gen. R. E. Lee took charge.
Mr. Sims also served under the famous Gen. Stonewall Jackson.
“Now he has joined his brothers in arms, most of whom have long preceded him to assemble around their glorious commanders under the beloved flag of the Southland.” A comrade comments.

 Contributed by 
Great Great Grandson David Hann
Commander,
Pvt. Meredith Pool Camp # 1505,
Hammonton, NJ
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The South Carolina Division would like to invite you to Share your Confederate Hero

If you have a photo of your Confederate Hero and would like to add him to the South Carolina Division Confederate Wall of Honor, we would like for you to send as much information and a photo that you would like to share.

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By | 2018-07-29T14:59:24+00:00 January 20th, 2014|Confederate Soldier Wall of Honor|0 Comments

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